Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

Using mixed effects models to compare differences in stress reactivity between women with and without a family history of breast cancer

Smith, Clair (2017) Using mixed effects models to compare differences in stress reactivity between women with and without a family history of breast cancer. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

[img]
Preview
PDF
Submitted Version

Download (372kB) | Preview

Abstract

Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women and affects hundreds of thousands of women and their families yearly in the United States. Having a family history of breast cancer is one of the strongest predictors of developing the disease. Previous studies have found evidence that women with a family history of breast cancer have excessive worry and intrusive thoughts about developing the disease and may react differently to stress than women who do not have a family history of breast cancer. This study uses the novel approach of measuring the activity of the autonomic nervous system to compare stress reactivity between women with and without a family history of breast cancer.
Eighty-two women with a family history of breast cancer and 140 women without a family history of breast cancer who were otherwise healthy underwent a laboratory stress test. During the test, their heart rate variability was measured as a proxy for the activity of the autonomic nervous system. Repeated measures of heart rate variability were taken at baseline, the three tasks of the stress test, and during a recovery period. The reactivity of the two groups throughout the test were compared using a mixed effects ANCOVA model. One of nine heart rate variability measures showed significant group differences. During the stress test, women with a family history of breast cancer had significantly higher levels of parasympathetic activity than women without a family history of breast cancer.
Public Health Significance: The results of this study can be used to further our understanding of the effects of having a family history of breast cancer.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Smith, Claircns45@pitt.educns45
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Thesis AdvisorKrafty, Robertrkrafty@pitt.edurkrafty
Committee MemberYouk, Adaayouk@pitt.eduayouk
Committee MemberBovbjerg, Danabovbjergdh@upmc.edu
Date: 29 June 2017
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 25 January 2017
Approval Date: 29 June 2017
Submission Date: 8 March 2017
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 58
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Biostatistics
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Heart Rate Variability
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2017 23:33
Last Modified: 29 Jun 2017 23:33
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/30946

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item