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Standing Between Reservation and Nation: Indigenous Performance in North America after the end of the Indian Wars

Harkulich, Christiana Fay Molldrem (2017) Standing Between Reservation and Nation: Indigenous Performance in North America after the end of the Indian Wars. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Standing Between Reservation and Nation:
Indigenous performance in North America after the end of the Indian Wars
Christiana Fay Molldrem Harkulich, PhD
University of Pittsburgh, 2017

This dissertation asserts that performance as a means of representation has a profound connection to the political position and projects of Indigenous peoples in North America. Through three case studies, my project is a constellational history of Indigenous performance’s decolonial imaginary and enactment. I theorize that the act of standing -- both figuratively standing for, i.e. representation, as well as the physical act of standing -- is a visible decolonial intervention into historical narratives of the Americas constructed and upheld by national (i.e. nation-state based) politics. Drawing from theatre and performance studies methodologies and historiographies, border theory, and coloniality, I argue that performances by Indigenous women function as critical moments of standing that destabilize and reconfigure nation-state bound histories, narratives, and borders. This is explored through three case studies of Indigenous women’s performances that span the 20th century: the first discusses Princess White Deer’s Vaudeville and Broadway performances in the 1910s-1920s and questions of citizenship; the second examines Anna Mae Pictou Aquash’s acts of standing during the protests of the American Indian Movement from 1968-1976 and questions of sovereignty; and the third analyzes Monique Mojica’s play and production of Princess Pocahontas and The Blue Spots and a decolonial dramaturgy in the 1990s. As a whole, this project points to the complicated political position of Indigenous peoples in North America and the necessity of acts of decolonial imagining.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Harkulich, Christiana Fay MolldremCFM15@pitt.eduCFM150000-0002-2317-1860
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairJackson-Schebetta, LisaLisajsch@pitt.edu
Committee MemberGranshaw, MichelleMkg31@pitt.edu
Committee MemberGeorge, Kathygeorgeke@pitt.edu
Committee MemberMonasterios, ElizabethELM15@pitt.edu
Date: 25 June 2017
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 10 April 2017
Approval Date: 25 June 2017
Submission Date: 7 April 2017
Access Restriction: 5 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 5 years.
Number of Pages: 244
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Theater Arts
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Theatre, Indigenous, Native American, Dance, Protest, Performance, Decolonial, Coloniality, Dramaturgy, American History, Theatre History
Date Deposited: 25 Jun 2017 21:35
Last Modified: 25 Jun 2017 21:35
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/31122

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  • Standing Between Reservation and Nation: Indigenous Performance in North America after the end of the Indian Wars. (deposited 25 Jun 2017 21:35) [Currently Displayed]

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