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THE IMPACT OF MULTIMEDIA FEEDBACK ON STUDENT PERCEPTIONS: VIDEO SCREENCAST WITH AUDIO COMPARED TO TEXT BASED EMAIL

Perkoski, Robert (2017) THE IMPACT OF MULTIMEDIA FEEDBACK ON STUDENT PERCEPTIONS: VIDEO SCREENCAST WITH AUDIO COMPARED TO TEXT BASED EMAIL. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

THE IMPACT OF MULTIMEDIA FEEDBACK ON STUDENT PERCEPTIONS: VIDEO SCREENCAST WITH AUDIO COMPARED TO TEXT BASED EMAIL
Robert R. Perkoski, Ed.D
University of Pittsburgh, 2017
Computer technology provides a plethora of tools to engage students and make the classroom more interesting. Much research has been conducted on the impact of educational technology regarding instruction but little has been done on students’ preferences for the type of instructor feedback (Watts, 2007).
Mayer (2005) has developed an integrative, cognitive theory of multimedia learning (CTML) stipulating a principle that deeper learning occurs with words and pictures rather than words alone. This multimedia principle may be relative to not just instruction but also feedback.
Does multimedia feedback using screencast video with audio increase the motivation of the learner over text based email feedback? This study will compare the impact of text based email feedback defined as instructor comments via email with no pictures, graphics, or animation versus multimedia based feedback using video screencasts with audio. In addition, this study will look at the impact of learning preference on student perceptions for the two different feedback types.
After comparing two groups of students each receiving different feedback treatments, the results indicate support for a higher rating by students regarding the clarity of instructor’s
comments, retention of information, motivation for the subject and motivation for the class with the multimedia based feedback. This result is in alignment with the cognitive theory of multimedia learning. However, there was limited evidence for the interaction between learning preference and type of feedback. Findings are discussed in regards to the study, the literature and practice.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Perkoski, Robertperks@pitt.eduperks
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairWeidman, Johnweidman@pitt.eduweidman
Committee MemberBickel, Williambickel@pitt.edubickel
Committee MemberTrovato, Charlenetrovato@pitt.edutrovato
Committee MemberWeiss, Martinmbw@pitt.edumbw
Date: 18 May 2017
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 11 April 2017
Approval Date: 18 May 2017
Submission Date: 8 May 2017
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 135
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: School of Education > Administrative and Policy Studies
Degree: EdD - Doctor of Education
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: multimedia feedback video screencast
Date Deposited: 18 May 2017 17:39
Last Modified: 18 May 2017 17:39
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/31759

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