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Caregiver Characteristics and Perceptions, Quality of Interactions with Children, and Children's Development in Family-Like Orphan Care in South Africa

Warner, Hilary A. (2017) Caregiver Characteristics and Perceptions, Quality of Interactions with Children, and Children's Development in Family-Like Orphan Care in South Africa. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

This mixed-methods study included a total of 49 children (birth to 5 years) and 28 caregivers from two family-like institutional care settings in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The purpose of the study was to assess the associations between caregivers’ age, education, experience, depression, and social support and the quality of interactions they have with the young children in their care, and to test the associations between caregiver-child interaction quality and child attachment and growth outcomes. Results indicated that caregivers’ perceived social support from friends was positively associated with caregiver-child interaction quality. In addition, among HIV+ children, interaction quality was positively associated with children’s height z-scores, and regardless of children’s HIV status, interaction quality was positively associated with children’s weight z-scores. No other significant associations were found. The qualitative portion of the study included an in-depth exploration of caregivers’ perceptions of their role, their reports of challenges they experience, and the resources they desire. Caregivers’ discourse about what their role entailed included each of the six parental role beliefs that comprise Mowder’s (2005) Parent Development Theory. This study contributes to the institutional orphan care field by addressing the shortage of research on care and development in existing family-like care settings, and includes recommendations for future research, policy, and practice.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Warner, Hilary A.haw45@pitt.eduhaw45
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee CoChairGroark, Christinacgroark@pitt.educgroark
Committee CoChairMcCall, Robertmccall2@pitt.edumccall2
Committee MemberWanless, Shannonswanless@pitt.eduswanless
Committee MemberPorter, Maureenmporter@pitt.edumporter
Date: 29 September 2017
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 5 June 2017
Approval Date: 29 September 2017
Submission Date: 28 June 2017
Access Restriction: 3 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 3 years.
Number of Pages: 194
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: School of Education > Psychology in Education
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Orphan care, HIV, Caregiver-child interactions, social support, physical growth, attachment
Date Deposited: 29 Sep 2017 13:48
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2017 13:48
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/32588

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