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FLUORESCENCE AS A TOOL FOR METHOD DEVELOPMENT, DETECTION OF TRACE ANALYTES, AND IMAGING

TRACEY, MATTHEW (2017) FLUORESCENCE AS A TOOL FOR METHOD DEVELOPMENT, DETECTION OF TRACE ANALYTES, AND IMAGING. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Since the first report in 1845, fluorescence has evolved into a ubiquitous and useful phenomenon. Fluorescence has found utility in the areas of analytical, organic, biological, and physical chemistry, with uses ranging from detection of trace analytes, use in imaging biological processes and conformations, as well as use as a model substrate to study reactivity and various transformations. Herein, the uses of fluorescence will be discussed with respect to these examples. Development of a new paradigm for catalytic assays will be presented using fluorogenic and colorimetric substrates. This approach was employed in the detection of trace palladium in active pharmaceutical ingredients as well as in polymers prepared by palladium catalysis and ores collected from a mining site. Additionally, the kinetics of an aqueous Tsuji-Trost reaction were studied using a fluorogenic substrate, enabling collection of a high density of information in a high-throughput manner. A change in the turnover-limiting step was uncovered, dependent on substrate concentration. The development of the first-in-kind blinking fluorophore for attachment to bioactive molecules by click chemistry as well as studies of Pittsburgh Green as a blinking fluorophore for super-resolution imaging are presented herein. These three projects demonstrate the utility of fluorescence as a tool for varied studies across multiple fields.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
TRACEY, MATTHEWmpt16@pitt.edumpt160000-0002-8015-9016
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairKoide, Kazunorikoide@pitt.edukoide
Committee MemberFloreancig, Paulflorean@pitt.eduflorean
Committee MemberLiu, Pengpengliu@pitt.edupengliu
Committee MemberWatkins, Simonsimon.watkins@pitt.eduswatkins
Date: 28 September 2017
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 7 August 2017
Approval Date: 28 September 2017
Submission Date: 9 August 2017
Access Restriction: 5 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 5 years.
Number of Pages: 178
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Chemistry
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: fluorescence, detection, super-resolution, chemosensor, chemodosimeter, kinetics, Tsuji-Trost, imaging, palladium
Date Deposited: 29 Sep 2017 00:58
Last Modified: 28 Sep 2018 05:00
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/33023

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