Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

The association of objectively measured physical activity on blood pressure and the prevalence of hypertension in African ancestry men

Cvejkus, Ryan (2018) The association of objectively measured physical activity on blood pressure and the prevalence of hypertension in African ancestry men. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

[img] PDF
Submitted Version
Restricted to University of Pittsburgh users only until April 2020.

Download (272kB) | Request a Copy

Abstract

Background: Hypertension is a causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease and accounts for 7.5 million deaths per year, globally, with disproportionately high rates in African ancestry populations. This study aimed to test the association of duration and intensity of objectively measured physical activity with blood pressure and prevalent hypertension in a sample of 310 Afro-Caribbean men.
Methods: Men for this study were from the Tobago Health Study and aged 50-89 years (mean 63 years). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP, respectively) were measured using an automated cuff, and hypertension was defined as SBP ≥ 140 mmHg, DBP ≥ 90 mmHg, or current use of antihypertensive medication. Physical activity was measured using the SenseWear Pro armband (SWA) worn at home for 4-7 days. We calculated daily step count and duration of waking time engaged in sedentary behavior (SB), light physical activity (LPA), and moderate to vigorous activity (MVPA). Multiple linear or logistic regressions were used to test for associations using the isotemporal substitution framework. Models were adjusted for SWA wear time, age, hypertension medication, alcohol consumption, smoking, comorbidities, family history of hypertension, and salt intake, and, additionally, for adiposity.
Results: Compared to SB, greater time spent engaged in LPA was associated with lower SBP adjusted for wear time (p<0.05), but this was attenuated after adjustment for age. Compared to SB, greater time spent engaged in LPA was associated with lower DBP and lower odds of hypertension, adjusted for wear time and age (p<0.05 for both). In unmedicated men, results for SBP and DBP were similar, but were also significant after adjustment for adiposity (p<0.05 for both). Greater step count was associated with lower odds of hypertension after full adjustment (p<0.05), but not after further adjustment for adiposity.
Conclusions: Replacing sedentary time with light activity was associated with lower blood pressures and odds of hypertension in older Afro-Caribbean men. The results are important to public health, adding evidence that increased physical activity could be beneficial in blood pressure management in this population.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Cvejkus, Ryanrkc14@pitt.edurkc140000-0001-5287-5341
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairKuipers, Allison L.kuipersa@edc.pitt.edukuipers
Committee MemberMiljkovic, Ivamiljkovici@edc.pitt.eduivm1
Committee MemberGibbs, Bethany B.bbarone@pitt.edusit.less
Date: 2018
Date Type: Submission
Defense Date: 3 April 2018
Approval Date: 28 June 2018
Submission Date: 20 April 2018
Access Restriction: 2 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 2 years.
Number of Pages: 47
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: hypertension exercise african ancestry objective physical activity tobago
Date Deposited: 28 Jun 2018 20:02
Last Modified: 28 Jun 2018 20:02
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/34064

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item