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Integration and differentiation within the Russian-speaking diaspora: Estonia and Kyrgyzstan

Stryker, Cian (2018) Integration and differentiation within the Russian-speaking diaspora: Estonia and Kyrgyzstan. Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The collapse of the Soviet Union and the subsequent stranded Russian-speaking diaspora in former Soviet republics created a unique environment for testing the effect of political institutions and economic climate on minority integration. Using descriptive quantitative data and over 30 interviews performed in Russian while living in Estonia and Kyrgyzstan, I analyze the levels of integration of these Russian-speaking minorities. Estonia and Kyrgyzstan provide the necessary conditions to test the effect of political institutions and economic climate on minority integration because they differ dramatically in these areas after independence. In comparing the two Russian-speaking minorities, I also assess overall identification, personal relation to the Russian Federation, general relation to the titular population, and reactions to Ukraine and Crimea.

My findings from both Estonia and Kyrgyzstan reveal that both minority groups have integrated into their host countries, but the degree of that integration differs substantially. The more robust Estonian economy and the inherent benefits from European Union membership prevented mass emigration after 1991, but slight discriminatory citizenship and Russian language policies result in a less integrated Russian community that tends towards local identification. The more accommodating Kyrgyz governmental policies, both in terms of citizenship and the Russian language, created a highly integrated minority population, but the poor economic climate of Kyrgyzstan incentivized the majority of the Russian-speaking community to immigrate back to Russia. The separate levels of integration and different forms identification achieved by both communities suggest that political institutions largely effect integration, but economic climate dictates emigration and can mitigate detrimental effects from discriminatory political institutions.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Stryker, Ciancis12@pitt.educis12
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Thesis AdvisorMurtazashvili, Jenniferjmurtaz@pitt.edu
Committee MemberReid, Patrykpar85@pitt.edu
Committee MemberWezel, Katjawezel@pitt.edu
Committee MemberSchulze, Jennieschulzej@duq.edu
Date: 1 May 2018
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 21 March 2018
Approval Date: 1 May 2018
Submission Date: 11 April 2018
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 76
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: University Honors College
Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Political Science
Degree: BPhil - Bachelor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Undergraduate Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Post-Soviet. Estonia. Kyrgyzstan. Baltic. Central Asia. Russian-Speakers. Minorities. Integration.
Date Deposited: 01 May 2018 20:00
Last Modified: 01 May 2018 20:00
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/34260

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  • Integration and differentiation within the Russian-speaking diaspora: Estonia and Kyrgyzstan. (deposited 01 May 2018 20:00) [Currently Displayed]

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