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A comparison of signal contingencies and response formats in ambulatory assessment

Himmelstein, Philip H. (2018) A comparison of signal contingencies and response formats in ambulatory assessment. Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Ambulatory assessment is a form of intensive repeated measurement that allows researchers to examine how constructs unfold over time within an individual’s natural environment. While its advantages over retrospective reports are well documented, it is less understood how methodological choices between signal contingencies and response formats influence the data that is collected. The present study aims to use big-five and interpersonal traits as well as social behavior and affect measured in the moment to determine whether signal and event contingent recording procedures or Visual Interpersonal Adjectives Scale (adjective slider) and behavioral checklist response formats provide equivalent data. Undergraduate psychology students (N = 197) completed baseline questionnaires, received training on smartphone use, and completed one week of ambulatory assessment. Signal and event contingencies were evaluated by comparing means and variances across groups, by comparing correlations between interpersonal behavior and affect within-person across groups, and by fitting multiple linear regressions with an interaction term between sampling condition and big-five trait, interpersonal trait, or positive or negative affect. Results indicate that signal and event contingent recording techniques provide equivalent results. Adjective slider and behavioral checklist response formats were evaluated by comparing the correlations between an interpersonal trait, big-five trait, or positive or negative affect and a dimension of interpersonal behavior measured using either the slider or the checklist format. In addition, correlations between positive or negative affect and dimensions of interpersonal behavior were compared within person across slider and checklist formats. Results suggest that when
measuring interpersonal agency, slider and checklist response formats provide equivalent results. Results suggest that when measuring interpersonal affiliation, the slider may be a slightly superior method of measurement.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Himmelstein, Philip H.phh15@pitt.eduphh15
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairWright, Aidanaidan@pitt.edu
Committee MemberPogue-Geile, Michaelmfpg@pitt.edu
Committee MemberLow, Carissacal69@pitt.edu
Committee MemberWoods, Williamwcw8@pitt.edu
Committee MemberHarari, Gabriellagabriella.harari@gmail.com
Date: 23 April 2018
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 9 April 2018
Approval Date: 23 April 2018
Submission Date: 12 April 2018
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 61
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: University Honors College
Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Psychology
Degree: BPhil - Bachelor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Undergraduate Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Ambulatory Assessment, Ecological Momentary Assessment, EMA, Event Contingent, Signal Contingent
Date Deposited: 23 Apr 2018 19:40
Last Modified: 23 Apr 2018 19:40
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/34274

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