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Occupational lung disease and the resurgence of progressive massive fibrosis

Joubert, Kyla (2018) Occupational lung disease and the resurgence of progressive massive fibrosis. Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

Occupational lung diseases are caused by the inhalation of inorganic dust leading to subsequent inflammation and fibrosis of lung tissue. Asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers’ pneumoconiosis are the most common forms of occupational lung disease. These diseases range in severity from clinically asymptomatic to end stage lung disease. There is no cure for these diseases; only symptomatic treatment exists. Lung transplantation is an option; however, the five-year survival remains one of the lowest among transplanted organs at approximately 50%. Despite federal regulation aimed at creating safer work place environments, occupational lung diseases persist today which makes this a significant public health problem. Coal workers’ pneumoconiosis in its most severe form, progressive massive fibrosis, was once thought to be nearly eradicated. Unfortunately, however, the United States has seen a resurgence of the disease over the past decade. This essay aims to discuss the current state of the occupational lung diseases in the U.S. and to provide insight into potential factors contributing to the increasing incidence of progressive massive fibrosis among coal miners.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Joubert, Kylakdj13@pitt.edukdj13
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairFinegold, David N.dnf@pitt.eduUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberMartinson, Jeremy J.jmartins@pitt.eduUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 26 April 2018
Date Type: Submission
Number of Pages: 21
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Multidisciplinary MPH
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 31 May 2019 17:33
Last Modified: 31 May 2019 17:33
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/34379

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