Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

HOW A WRAP-AROUND, COHORT MODEL SUPPORTS UNDERREPRESENTED, FIRST-TIME WOMEN TRAVELERS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THEIR GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES

Wagner, Sarah (2018) HOW A WRAP-AROUND, COHORT MODEL SUPPORTS UNDERREPRESENTED, FIRST-TIME WOMEN TRAVELERS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THEIR GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

[img] PDF
Restricted to University of Pittsburgh users only until 3 October 2019.

Download (790kB) | Request a Copy

Abstract

This dissertation examines the impact of a wrap-around cohort model on the development of the global perspectives of underrepresented, first-time women travelers. The VIH Program is a cohort-based, wrap-around (predeparture and reentry) curricular model designed specifically for underrepresented students from fifteen institutions. International education data illustrates that the following populations are underrepresented in study abroad: Pell Grant recipients, STEM majors, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBTQIA+ students, students registered with their institution’s Disability Office, as well as first-time travelers. Literature substantiates that networks and cohorts can empower underrepresented groups, yet the majority of U.S. institutions offer predeparture and reentry programmatic options aimed at the individual. By conducting a series of three focus groups with underrepresented, invested graduates of the VIH Program, a series of best practices around a wrap-around cohort model were gleaned. Four key implications for practice emerge from this study. 1) The wrap-around cohort model contributes to the development of underrepresented students’ cognitive, interpersonal, and intrapersonal learnings. 2) The wrap-around cohort model has the potential to not only develop our students’ global perspectives but also to fine-tune their ability to navigate diversity domestically. 3) International educators need to not only increase compositional diversity but also empower underrepresented students through culturally responsive pedagogical practices. 4) Inter-institutional collaborations can provide fertile ground for supporting underrepresented students. This study demonstrates that underrepresented students’ intersectional identities inform their international experiences, and that a wrap-around cohort model supports them in the development of the cognitive, interpersonal, and intrapersonal dimensions of their global perspectives. Future research on the cohort model is needed to further position underrepresented students to enhance their global perspectives.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Wagner, Sarahsewst29@pitt.edusewst29
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairFerketish, Jeanferkjean@pitt.eduferkjean
Committee MemberLovorn, Michaellovorn@pitt.edulovorn
Committee MemberTorres, Belkysbtorres@pitt.edubtorres
Date: 3 October 2018
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 26 June 2018
Approval Date: 3 October 2018
Submission Date: 2 October 2018
Access Restriction: 1 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 1 year.
Number of Pages: 145
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: School of Education > Administrative and Policy Studies
Degree: EdD - Doctor of Education
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Diversity, international education, global competencies, gender, empowerment
Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2018 14:01
Last Modified: 03 Oct 2018 14:01
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/35378

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item