Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

Adult Attachment Ratings (AAR) / Adult Attachment Prototype Rating (AAPR

Pilkonis, Paul (2018) Adult Attachment Ratings (AAR) / Adult Attachment Prototype Rating (AAPR. [Dataset] (Unpublished)

[img] Other (SPSS Statistics Data Document)
Data
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (88kB)
[img] Other (SPSS Statistics Data Document)
Data
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (140kB)
[img] Other (SPSS Statistics Data Document)
Data
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (128kB)
[img] Other (SPSS Statistics Data Document)
Data
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (129kB)
[img] Other (SPSS Statistics Data Document)
Data
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution No Derivatives.

Download (41kB)

Abstract

Studies

1. Validity in the Diagnosis of Personality Disorders ("Validity")
2. Screening for Personality Disorders ("Screening")
3. Interpersonal Functioning in Borderline Personality ("Interpersonal Functioning")
4. Interpersonal Functioning and Emotion in Borderline Personality ("Emotion and Interpersonal Functioning")
5. Interpersonal Functioning and Emotion in Borderline Personality ("Couples")

Description: The AAPR was internally developed with the aim of categorizing attachment style (Pilkonis et al, 1998). It is a clinician rated measure that includes seven scales organized around traditional themes from the attachment literature: anxious, ambivalent attachment (excessive dependency, interpersonal ambivalence, and compulsive care-giving), avoidant attachment (rigid self-control, defensive separation, and emotional detachment), and secure attachment (with a single scale of the same name). The scales vary in length from 6 to 16 items, with each item requiring a 3-point rating: 0 (absent); 1 (present); or, 2 (strongly present). Items for each attachment style are summed and the ranking determined by attachment scores and clinical judgment.

Sample features of these seven prototypes are as follows: (a) secure attachment, high degree of comfort and confidence in the context of close relationships; (b) defensive separation, avoidance of close relationships and preference for self-sufficiency; (c) excessive dependency, proximity-seeking and fear of interpersonal rejection; (d) borderline features, ambivalent and erratic feelings and behaviors in close relationships (e) obsessive-compulsive features, perfectionistic, rigid, and unemotional interpersonal style; (f) emotional detachment or antisocial features, insensitivity to other people’s concerns and reckless self-focus; and (g) compulsive care-giving, tendency to act as a “martyr” or consistently provide help instead of receiving it.

(From Meyer & Pilkonis, 2001): The scales were developed from a large pool of 88 descriptive phrases characterizing the variants of attachment from the Bowlby–Ainsworth tradition (and more broadly, the literature on excessively dependent vs. overly autonomous personality styles, e.g., Blatt, 2008); that is, anxiety and preoccupation about attachment, avoidance and dismissive attitudes regarding attachment, and secure attachment displayed in a modulated blend of affiliation and autonomy. “

In the Couples’ Study, an abbreviated version based on Pilkonis, Kim, Yu, & Morse’s 2014 IRT analysis was used. This version had 5 items per scale, instead of the 6-16 of the original measure. Also in Pilkonis et al (2014), the assessment name was “Adult Attachment Ratings (AAR)” – the term prototype was dropped due to Reviewer preferences.

The order of prototypes changed across studies

In the validity study, clinicians were asked to rate their level of confidence in the assigned prototypes.

Citations:
Blatt S. (2008). Polarities of experience: Relatedness and self-definition in personality development, psychopathology, and the therapeutic process. American Psychological Association; Washington, DC.
Meyer, B., & Pilkonis, P. A. (2001). Attachment style. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 38(4), 466.

Pilkonis PA. Personality proto-types among depressives: Themes of dependency and autonomy. Journal of Personality Disorders. 1988;2:144–152.

Pilkonis, P. A., Kim, Y., Yu, L., & Morse, J. Q. (2014). Adult Attachment Ratings (AAR): An Item Response Theory Analysis. Journal of Personality Assessment, 96(4), 417–425.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: Dataset
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Pilkonis, Paulpap1@pitt.edupap10000-0003-1075-0617
Date: 10 October 2018
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Psychiatry
Funders: NIMH
Type of Data: Database
Copyright Holders: None
Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2018 18:11
Last Modified: 11 Oct 2018 18:11
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/35390

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item