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United States historical rape trends and multi-country comparison

Riccelli, Catherine (2019) United States historical rape trends and multi-country comparison. Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

Background: Rape impacts multiple facets of the victim’s life. Despite continued efforts to control this violent offense, rape is still a major public health issue. The objective of this analysis is to aggregate the occurrence of rape in the United States and compare its prevalence with three other nations, Canada, South Africa, and Sweden, to provide a comprehensive insight into how widespread this crime is.
Methods: Data analytics and data mining were conducted on FBI published information spanning from 2001 to 2017 on three rape-related crime indicators. Information from other nations were obtained from the country’s respective reporting agencies. The data were then aggregated to provide insights into the past and current U.S. trends and how they compare to other countries.
Results: The findings show that rape is still a critical public health area of concern, not just nationally, but also globally. The findings reveal that since the revision to the FBI’s definition of rape, reported rape increased. All nations observed, other than South Africa, demonstrate an increasing trend in their national prevalence of rape.
Conclusions: Whether due to better reporting or increased frequency of rape occurring, rape offenses are on the rise. This is important to note because of the widespread and long-lasting impacts rape can have on victims. Governments must be mindful and proactive to counter this trend. National governments are encouraged to adopt improved educational campaigns targeted towards at-risk groups (perpetrators and victims), robust reporting standardization from criminal justice agencies, and better support services for victims.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Riccelli, Catherinecjr61@pitt.educjr61
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairJarlenski, Marianmarian.jarlenski@pitt.edumpjUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberTerry, Marthamaterry@pitt.edumaterryUNSPECIFIED
Date: 24 April 2019
Date Type: Submission
Number of Pages: 42
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Health Policy & Management
Degree: MHA - Master of Health Administration
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 08 Oct 2019 22:05
Last Modified: 08 Oct 2019 22:05
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/36618

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