Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

Weaponising controversy: a demarcation of illegitimate dissent

Ramos Neto, Iolanda (2019) Weaponising controversy: a demarcation of illegitimate dissent. Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

[img]
Preview
PDF
Download (446kB) | Preview

Abstract

Climate change research has faced increased public scrutiny over the last several years. The scientific consensus on anthropogenic climate change has significant public policy implications, and this, combined with the resulting public scrutiny, has had material consequence to how science in this field is done. Dissenting research, as well as dissent more generally, is often made in a way that is damaging to the pursuit of knowledge, instead of beneficial to it.

While historical accounts of ‘epistemically detrimental dissent’ (EDD) have captured some of the ways these views are created and spread, establishing strict criteria for these without implicating the normal dissent that is so crucial to scientific practice, remains difficult. After discussing the background of EDD in existing philosophical literature, an alternative – the communications account of epistemically detrimental dissent – is proposed.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Ramos Neto, Iolandaipr4@pitt.eduipr40000-0002-9077-8400
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairDietrich, Michaelmdietrich@pitt.edu
Committee MemberMitchell, Sandrasmitchel@pitt.edu
Committee MemberPlutynski, Anyaaplutyns@wustl.edu
Committee MemberChirimuuta, Mazviitamac289@pitt.edu
Date: 28 August 2019
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 8 May 2019
Approval Date: 28 August 2019
Submission Date: 7 June 2019
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 37
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: University Honors College
Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > History and Philosophy of Science
Degree: BPhil - Bachelor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Undergraduate Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: climate change, philosophy, philosophy of science, philosophy of climate change
Date Deposited: 28 Aug 2019 19:13
Last Modified: 28 Aug 2019 19:13
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/36730

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item