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El Proceso: Understanding Facilitators and Barriers To Reporting Sexual Assault Among Gay Latino Men

Jacobson López, Daniel (2019) El Proceso: Understanding Facilitators and Barriers To Reporting Sexual Assault Among Gay Latino Men. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

While literature has more recently begun to examine sexual assault against men, there is a paucity of research that examines the reporting process among gay men of color. Researchers have consistently found that gay men are more likely to be sexually assaulted than their heterosexual counterparts. After an individual is sexually assaulted, they may decide to report being sexually assaulted to reporting authorities. Homophobia has been identified as a barrier to reporting sexual assault among male sexual assault survivors, although racism has not yet been examined as a potential barrier. This study draws upon gender performativity and practice theories through an intersectional lens to provide a theoretical framework to explain barriers and facilitators perceived and experienced among gay Latino men. The aims of this study were: 1) what factors influence gay Latino men’s decision making about whether to report being sexually assaulted 2) what barriers and facilitators do gay Latino men experience when they report being sexually assaulted to legal authorities 3) how does the racial/ethnic and sexual identity of gay Latino sexual assault survivors affect how authorities respond to and address their reports of sexual assault. Fourteen men (N=14) participated in the study from six cities in the United States. Participants were recruited through a newspaper, a geosocial networking app, and personal contacts. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted either in English or Spanish. They were audio-recorded, translated and transcribed verbatim. A grounded theory approach was utilized and coding methods consistent with grounded theory methodology were conducted. Three themes emerged from the data; nine factors were identified as barriers to reporting sexual assault, eight factors as negative repercussions experienced when reporting sexual assault and four factors as facilitators to reporting sexual assault. All men who reported being sexually assaulted experienced racism and/or homophobia by authorities. Findings revealed survivors were re-traumatized during the reporting process and did not receive medical care or social service referrals. Recommendations include training on male sexual assault, the LGBT Latinx community, culturally-congruent and trauma-informed best practices for medical and mental health care providers, and a need for agencies to implement inclusive and clear sexual assault policies.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Jacobson López, Danieldaj57@Pitt.edu0000-0002-6407-8590
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairGoodkind, Sarasara.goodkind@pitt.edu
Committee MemberEngel, Rafaelrengel@pitt.edu
Committee MemberBooth, Jaimejmbooth@pitt.edu
Committee MemberJackson, Jr, John Ldean@asc.upenn.edu
Committee MemberGarcía, Antonioantgar@upenn.edu
Date: 17 May 2019
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 3 April 2019
Approval Date: 17 May 2019
Submission Date: 17 May 2019
Access Restriction: 3 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 3 years.
Number of Pages: 228
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: School of Social Work > Social Work
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: sexual assault, rape, gay, Latino, gay men, sexual assault survivors, Hispanic, Black, barriers, facilitators, reporting. survivors, homophobia, racism, Black Latino,
Additional Information: Spanish interviews as well
Date Deposited: 26 Jun 2019 13:23
Last Modified: 26 Jun 2019 13:23
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/36750

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