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Emergence of Social Complexity and Community building in the Late Neolithic (5400-4600 cal. BCE) of the Central Balkans

Kocic, Miroslav (2019) Emergence of Social Complexity and Community building in the Late Neolithic (5400-4600 cal. BCE) of the Central Balkans. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

This doctoral dissertation investigates the diachronic social changes that occurred in the Central Balkan’s region of Šumadija (Gruža River valley), in present day Serbia, during the Late Neolithic period (5400-4600 BCE). At this time, communities known as the Vinča archaeological culture are characterized by many remarkable changes, such as the emergence of large scale settlements with defensive features, and also technological innovations in the form of pyrotechnic mastery in production of intricate pottery styles, shaft mining technology, and some of the earliest extractive metallurgy in the world. Dissertation field research was funded by a National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant (# 1741667) titled: “Domesticated Plants, Animals and the Emergence of Social Complexity”. Research included the development of methodological practices combining surface artifact collection over a regional area of 100 square kilometers combining non-invasive geophysical prospection surveys on selected sites. Analysis of the data collected showed extremely important regional scale shifts concerning population densities, socio-economic patterns, and settlement organization with population centralization already by the Early Neolithic (~5500 BCE). Subsequent population trends indicate a nearly total depopulation of the valley by the end of the Neolithic Period. Results also indicate the presence of community conflict as reflected in settlement patterning, large scale enclosure ditches, and proximity to and control over natural resources in the valley.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Kocic, Miroslavmik74@pitt.edumik74
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairHanks, Bryanbkh5@pitt.edu
Committee MemberArkush, ElizabethARKUSH@pitt.edu
Committee MemberBermann, Marcbermarc@pitt.edu
Committee MemberAbbott, Markmabbott1@pitt.edu
Date: 27 September 2019
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 25 April 2019
Approval Date: 27 September 2019
Submission Date: 9 August 2019
Access Restriction: 2 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 2 years.
Number of Pages: 268
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Anthropology
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Archaeology, Balkans, Complexity, Neolithic, Vinča, Warfare
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2019 15:55
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2019 15:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/37333

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