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External shame's relationship with mental health outcomes in Asians and White Americans

Molleti, Lalit (2020) External shame's relationship with mental health outcomes in Asians and White Americans. Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Research exploring shame’s relationship with mental health is under researched. Thus, factors contributing to mental health are not well understood cross-culturally. Additionally, research often does not differentiate between external and internal shame, which makes unclear the relationship between shame and mental health. This study examines the relationship between external and internal shame with mental health outcomes in Asians and White Americans. Asian and White American participants were recruited through an online survey platform. This study examined whether race moderated the relationship of internal and external shame with mental health outcomes and whether the differential experience of shame with mental health outcomes. Additionally, we hypothesized that internal shame and external shame mediated race’s relationship with mental health outcomes. Results indicated that race was not a moderator of internal and external shame’s relationship with mental health outcomes and internal shame and external shame were not mediators of race’s relationship with mental health outcomes. However, exploratory analyses suggested that internal shame mediated the relationship of external shame with depression and future anxiety in both White Americans and Asians. Additionally, exploratory analyses revealed that external shame was a significant predictor of depression in Asians in the context of public failure. The results suggest that internal and external shame are important predictors of mental health outcomes for both Asians and Whites, and external shame may be especially important for Asians in the context of public (versus private) failure.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Molleti, Lalitlsm43@pitt.edulsm43
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairBinning, Kevinkbinning@pitt.edukbinning
Committee MemberHenry, Daphnedaphne.henry@bc.edu
Committee MemberWang, Ming-Temtwang@pitt.edu
Committee MemberShin, Seung-Hwanshs39@pitt.edu
Date: 4 May 2020
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 22 April 2020
Approval Date: 4 May 2020
Submission Date: 24 April 2020
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 57
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: University Honors College
Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Psychology
Degree: BPhil - Bachelor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Undergraduate Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: internal shame, depression, future anxiety, empathy, self esteem, race, asian, white, american
Date Deposited: 04 May 2020 19:37
Last Modified: 04 May 2020 19:37
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/38781

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