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Demodulations of Fiber Optical Sensors using Buneman Frequency Analysis for High Temperature Sensing Applications

Zhu, Chengqi (2021) Demodulations of Fiber Optical Sensors using Buneman Frequency Analysis for High Temperature Sensing Applications. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Since their inventions, fiber optical sensors (FOSs) have been playing indispensable roles in structure health monitoring. Compared with electronic sensors, FOSs show merit of immunities to electromagnetic fields, resilience in high-temperature harsh environments. The capability of multiplexing many fiber sensors on a single optical fiber makes FOS unique sensor devices to perform distributing sensing.
One of key challenges to perform measurements using fiber sensors is to develop computationally efficient algorithms to demodulate fiber sensors. In this thesis, we explore Buneman frequency estimation (BFE) as a rapid and highly accurate algorithm to determine optical cavity length of multiplexed intrinsic Fabry–Pérot interferometers (IFPIs) and resonance wavelength of Fiber Bragg grating (FBGs). The demodulation algorithm was tested on IFPI sensors with cavity length between 200-µm and 1600-µm. The same demodulation algorithm was also tested on FBG sensors with resonance wavelength around 1550-nm. The computational efficiency and robustness of the new algorithm are compared with a Gaussian FBG peak fitting method. To demonstrate applications of the demodulation algorithm, FBG resonance wavelength in nuclear reactor was tracked for 55 days.
The method presented in this thesis provides a real-time demodulation scheme to track FBG wavelength and to determine optical cavity length changes using low-resolution interrogation schemes such as low-resolution spectrometers or a tunable laser. It has potential to greatly reduce the cost of fiber sensor systems.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Zhu, Chengqichz85@pitt.educhz85
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairChen, Kevinpec9@pitt.edupec9
Committee MemberMao, Zhi-hongzhm4@pitt.eduzhm4
Committee MemberXiong, Fengf.xiong@pitt.edu
Date: 26 January 2021
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 28 September 2020
Approval Date: 26 January 2021
Submission Date: 10 November 2020
Access Restriction: 1 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 1 year.
Number of Pages: 56
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Swanson School of Engineering > Electrical and Computer Engineering
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Fiber Optical Sensors
Date Deposited: 26 Jan 2021 19:18
Last Modified: 26 Jan 2021 19:18
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/39871

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