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The effect of a 6 months African dance physical activity intervention on perceived physical fatigability: The Rhythm Experience and Africana Culture Trial (REACT)

Williams, Mihloti (2021) The effect of a 6 months African dance physical activity intervention on perceived physical fatigability: The Rhythm Experience and Africana Culture Trial (REACT). Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

Background/Objective: Sedentary lifestyles are associated with higher fatigue. Higher levels of fatigue observed with advanced aging contributes to lower levels of physical activities among older adults. African Americans have among the highest prevalence of physical inactivity compared to other races. They are disproportionally affected by health disturbances. Participating in regular physical activity plays an important role in reducing health disparities associated with disabling effects of aging. This study examines the effects of a 6-month African dance intervention on changes in perceived physical fatigability.

Methods: Twenty participants in the study were randomized into the African Dance group while the other twenty were in the control group. Physical fitness was measured using peak VO2 and perceived physical fatigability with the Pittsburgh Fatigability Scale (PFS). Fatigue was measured using traditional fatigue questions from validated questionnaires. T-tests and Chi-squared tests were used to assess differences between the groups. Pearson correlation was used to assess the relationship between continuous variables.

Results: The mean age of the dance group was 66.1±4.36 and 67.3±4.98 for culture. Both groups showed low levels of fitness with a mean peak VO2 of 16.6±5.17 for dance and 16.0±4.43 for culture. The mean physical fatigability level was slightly higher in the dance group (16.1±10.3) compared to culture (13.0±8.63) but the differences were not statistically significant, (p=0.34). The prevalence of greater perceived physical fatigability in this population was 50 percent with females reporting higher levels of perceived physical fatigability. PFS was correlated with measures of physical function and fitness. PFS physical scores increased post intervention in both groups, with and without adjusting for baseline peak VO2, sex and age, p=0.57.

Conclusions:
The preliminary results from this pilot study do not provide a strong evidence of the effectiveness of the intervention in modifying perceived physical fatigability. Increased sample size from the full REACT cohort will be important to evaluate whether a dance intervention reduces perceived physical fatigability in older adults, as we know it is an important mediator in the relationship between physical activity and function. By identifying an enjoyable, culturally relevant intervention for older underserved adults, we can intervene along the disablement pathway.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Williams, Mihlotimihloti.williams@pitt.edumfw28
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairGlynn, NancyEPIDNWG@pitt.eduUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberKirk, Ericksonkiericks@pitt.eduUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberChaeryon, Kangcrkang@pitt.eduUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 10 February 2021
Date Type: Completion
Number of Pages: 71
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2021 16:05
Last Modified: 10 Feb 2021 16:05
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/40007

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