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Violence in Times of Peace: How Trauma Perpetuates Family Violence in Post-Conflict Environments

Amendola, Alyssa (2020) Violence in Times of Peace: How Trauma Perpetuates Family Violence in Post-Conflict Environments. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Post-conflict regions have the highest rates of domestic family violence (DFV). While there are several root causes of DFV, conflict is an exacerbating factor for a few reasons. This paper hypothesizes that untreated trauma in ex-combatants contributes to the rise in DFV post-conflict in two main ways. First, untreated trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) cause ex-combatants to recognize and respond aggressively to nonthreatening situations, as explained by the Cycle of Violence Theory. Second, untreated trauma and challenges to gender norms cause ex-combatants to overcompensate with aggression, as explained by the Gender Roles theory. To test this hypothesis, a literature review will study rates of PTSD and DFV in post-conflict regions. Two case studies will be used to evaluate trends. Finally, based on the literature review and case studies, evidence-based recommendations will be identified to address mental health needs of ex-combatants.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Amendola, Alyssaamamendola11@gmail.comama246
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairTerry, Martha Annmaterry@pitt.edumaterry
Committee MemberFinkel, Mugemfinkel@pitt.edumfinkel
Committee MemberVan Nostrand, Elizabethevannostrand@pitt.eduevannostrand
Date: 11 December 2020
Defense Date: 3 December 2020
Approval Date: 2 February 2021
Submission Date: 11 December 2020
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 61
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Behavioral and Community Health Sciences
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: conflict PTSD Domestic violence family violence Peru Liberia FORNET
Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2021 18:30
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2021 18:30
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/40078

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