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Racial differences in college students’ knowledge, self-efficacy, and use of sexual violence services: a cross-sectional analysis

Balascio, Phoebe (2022) Racial differences in college students’ knowledge, self-efficacy, and use of sexual violence services: a cross-sectional analysis. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background: Sexual violence is highly prevalent on college campuses. Campuses implement prevention measures to increase awareness and reduce barriers to help-seeking and disclosure of campus sexual violence victimization. Current literature examines students’ knowledge, self-efficacy, and use of sexual violence services to determine how these factors influence individual outcomes after victimization. Students are color are disproportionately affected by campus sexual violence; however, it remains unknown if and how race impacts students’ knowledge of sexual violence services, self-efficacy to utilize sexual violence services, use of sexual violence services. The purpose of this study was to determine differences in college students’ knowledge, self-efficacy, and use of sexual violence services by racial categorization. We hypothesized that students of color who visit campus health centers would have lower self-reported rates of knowledge, self-efficacy, and use of sexual violence services, compared to white counterparts.
Methods: This study was a secondary data analysis of the Giving Information for Trauma Support and Safety (GIFTSS) study. GIFTSS was a randomized control trial conducted from 2015-2018 at 28 Western Pennsylvania and West Virginia campus health centers. We analyzed baseline survey data. Race was operationalized both aggregated (“white” compared to “students of color”) and disaggregated by self-reported race/ethnicity. For primary analysis, we used unadjusted regression models to compare the knowledge of sexual violence services, self-efficacy to utilize sexual violence services, use of sexual violence services by race.
Results: The sample included 2259 students, predominately white (67.8%), and cisgender female (73.3%). Students of color reported lower knowledge of sexual violence services than white students. Specifically, Asian students reported lower knowledge compared to white students. Students of color reported greater self-efficacy to use services and greater service utilization than white students. Specifically, Black students reported greater self-efficacy and greater odds of use compared to white students.
Public Health Significance: Racial disparities in college students’ knowledge, self-efficacy, and use of sexual violence services continue to exist, indicating persistent gaps in current campus sexual violence prevention efforts. This study supports the need for further research to understand students of colors’ unique needs and experiences related to sexual violence.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Balascio, Phoebeplb29@pitt.eduplb29
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Thesis AdvisorHawkins, Marquismarquis.hawkins@pitt.edumarquis.hawkins
Committee MemberHill, Ashley V.avh16@pitt.eduavh16
Committee MemberCoulter, Robert W.S.robert.ws.coulter@pitt.edurobert.ws.coulter
Committee MemberMiller, Elizabethelizabeth.miller@chp.edu
Date: 4 January 2022
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 1 December 2021
Approval Date: 4 January 2022
Submission Date: 2 December 2021
Access Restriction: 2 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 2 years.
Number of Pages: 74
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: sexual violence, campus sexual violence, racial disparities
Date Deposited: 04 Jan 2022 15:33
Last Modified: 04 Jan 2022 15:33
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/41991

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