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In vitro propagation and homing of liver-derived dendritic cell progenitors to lymphoid tissues of allogeneic recipients: Implications for the establishment and maintenance of donor cell chimerism following liver transplantation

Thomson, AW and Lu, L and Subbotin, VM and Li, Y and Qian, S and Rao, AS and Fung, JJ and Starzl, TE (1995) In vitro propagation and homing of liver-derived dendritic cell progenitors to lymphoid tissues of allogeneic recipients: Implications for the establishment and maintenance of donor cell chimerism following liver transplantation. Transplantation, 59 (4). 544 - 551. ISSN 0041-1337

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Abstract

Dendritic cell (DC) progenitors were propagated in liquid culture from nonparenchymal cells resident in normal mouse (B10.BR; H-2 < sup > k < /sup > , I-E < sup > + < /sup > ) liver in response to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The liver-derived DC progenitors were MHC class II-/dim and did not express counter receptors for CTLA-4, a structural homologue of the Т cell activation molecule CD28. Following subcutaneous or intravenous injection, these liver-derived cells migrated to Т cell-dependent areas of lymph nodes and spleen of unmodified, allogeneic (BIO; H-2 < sup > b < /sup > ; I-E_) recipients, where they were identified 1-5 days, and 1 and 2 months after injection by their strong surface expression of donor MHC class II (I-E < sup > k < /sup > ) and their dendritic morphology. Maximal numbers of liver-derived DC in the spleen were recorded 5 days after injection. Both clusters of strongly donor MHC class II+ cells— and (more rarely) dividing cells—could also be identified, suggesting cell replication in situ. Using the same techniques employed to generate DC progenitors from normal liver, GM-CSF-stimulated cells were propagated for 10 days from the bone marrow and spleen of nonimmunosuppressed mice sacrificed 14 days after orthotopic liver transplantation (B10;H-2 < sup > b < /sup > → C3H;H-2 < sup > k < /sup > ). Immunocytochemical staining for recipient and donor MHC class II phenotype revealed the growth both of host cells with DC characteristics, and of cells expressing donor alloantigens (I-A < sup > b < /sup > ). These results are consistent with the growth, in response to GM-CSF, of donor-derived DC from progenitors seeded from the liver allograft to recipient lymphoid tissue. The functional activity of the progenitors of chimeric DC and the possible role of these cells in the establishment and maintenance of donor-specific tolerance following liver transplantation remain to be determined. © 1995 by Williams and Wilkins.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Thomson, AW
Lu, L
Subbotin, VM
Li, Y
Qian, S
Rao, AS
Fung, JJ
Starzl, TEtes11@pitt.eduTES11
Centers: Other Centers, Institutes, or Units > Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute
Date: 27 February 1995
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: Transplantation
Volume: 59
Number: 4
Page Range: 544 - 551
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 0041-1337
Other ID: uls-drl:31735062125400, Starzl CV No. 1726
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2010 17:29
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2017 22:56
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/5112

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