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The effect of small bowel transplantation on the morphology and physiology of intestinal muscle: A comparison of autografts versus allografts in dogs

Sugitani, A and Bauer, AJ and Reynolds, JC and Halfter, WM and Nomoto, M and Starzl, TE and Todo, S (1997) The effect of small bowel transplantation on the morphology and physiology of intestinal muscle: A comparison of autografts versus allografts in dogs. Transplantation, 63 (2). 186 - 194. ISSN 0041-1337

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Abstract

The effects of acute (AR) and chronic rejection (CR) on intestinal smooth muscle that are responsible for the dysmotility following small bowel transplantation (SBTX) are incompletely understood. Jejunal and ileal specimens from normal control dogs (n=7), and autotransplanted dogs were examined at 7 days (n=6) and 1 (n=7), 3 (n=6), 6 (n=6), and 12 months (n=6). Allotransplanted dogs that developed AR (n=8) and CR (n=5) were examined for gross and microscopic morphology (muscle thickness, the number and size of myocytes, and inflammatory infiltrate), and for contractile and intracellular electrical function in vitro. Auto-SBTX did not alter morphology at any period, but contractile function was impaired at 7 days (73.6%) compared with normal intestine. Acute rejection did not influence myocyte number or size, but was associated with a prominent infiltrate of neutrophils and lymphocytes, and severely impaired contractile function (20.6%) compared with auto-SBTX controls. Acute rejection also significantly inhibited the amplitude of slow waves and of inhibitory junction potentials. Chronic rejection caused thickening of muscularis propria by both hyperplasia (175.5%) and hypertrophy (202.6%) accompanied by moderate inflammatory cell infiltrate compared with auto-SBTX controls. We conclude that the marked inflammatory infiltrate into the muscularis propria indicates that the graft muscle is injured by both acute and chronic rejection; impaired function of intestinal smooth muscle following SBTX results from both rejection and the injury associated with transplantation, and chronic rejection following SBTX is associated with both hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the muscularis propria.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Sugitani, A
Bauer, AJ
Reynolds, JC
Halfter, WM
Nomoto, M
Starzl, TEtes11@pitt.eduTES11
Todo, S
Centers: Other Centers, Institutes, or Units > Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute
Date: 27 January 1997
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: Transplantation
Volume: 63
Number: 2
Page Range: 186 - 194
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1097/00007890-199701270-00003
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 0041-1337
Other ID: uls-drl:31735062121821, Starzl CV No. 1832
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2010 17:31
Last Modified: 20 Oct 2017 06:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/5218

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