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Hepatitis C virus genotypes in liver transplant recipients: Impact on posttransplant recurrence, infections, response to interferon-α therapy and outcome

Gayowski, T and Singh, N and Marino, IR and Vargas, H and Wagener, M and Wannstedt, C and Morelli, F and Laskus, T and Fung, JJ and Rakela, J and Starzl, TE (1997) Hepatitis C virus genotypes in liver transplant recipients: Impact on posttransplant recurrence, infections, response to interferon-α therapy and outcome. Transplantation, 64 (3). 422 - 426. ISSN 0041-1337

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Abstract

Background. End-stage liver disease due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common indication for liver transplantation in U.S. veterans. We investigated the influence of HCV genotypes on the incidence and timing of recurrent HCV hepatitis, survival, infectious morbidity, and response to interferon-α therapy in this unique patient population. Methods. HCV genotype was determined by direct sequencing of the NS5 region of HCV with type-specific primers. Results. Genotype 1a (66%, 32/47) was the predominant genotype. Type 1b was found in 25% (12/47) of patients and type 2b was found in 9% (4/47). His topathologically recurrent HCV hepatitis developed in 53% (25/47) of the patients after transplantation. This group included 45% (14/31) of the patients with type 1a, 67% (8/12) of the patients with type 1b, and 25% (1/4) of the patients with type 2b (P > 0.5). The time to recurrence and the severity of HCV recurrence as defined by aminotransferase levels or Knodell scores were not different among the three genotypes. There was a trend toward a higher incidence of major infections in patients with type 1b (75%) versus type 1a (48%) and type 2b (50%) (P=0.11). The response to interferon-α therapy did not differ significantly among the genotypes. Mortality at 5 years was 16% (5/31) in patients with genotype 1a, 42% (5/12) in patients with genotype 1b, and 50% (2/4) in patients with genotype 2b (P=0.06). Conclusio ns. The incidence, time to recurrence, and response to interferon-α therapy did not differ be tween the various genotypes in our liver transplant recipients. However, there was a trend toward higher infectious morbidity and overall mortality in patients with genotype 1b after transplantation.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Gayowski, T
Singh, N
Marino, IR
Vargas, H
Wagener, M
Wannstedt, C
Morelli, F
Laskus, T
Fung, JJ
Rakela, J
Starzl, TEtes11@pitt.eduTES11
Centers: Other Centers, Institutes, or Units > Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute
Date: 15 August 1997
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: Transplantation
Volume: 64
Number: 3
Page Range: 422 - 426
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1097/00007890-199708150-00009
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 0041-1337
Other ID: uls-drl:31735062127208, Starzl CV No. 1998
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2010 17:34
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2017 20:57
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/5384

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