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THERAPEUTIC DEVELOPMENT FOR CYSTIC FIBROSIS

Thomas, Kristina (2012) THERAPEUTIC DEVELOPMENT FOR CYSTIC FIBROSIS. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    This thesis considers the aspects of therapeutics development for Cystic Fibrosis (CF). The studies are directed at the development of a new therapeutic outcome measurement for evaluating the performance of CF medications. This imaging-based outcome measures the absorption of a small-molecular radiopharmaceutical, Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) from the airways as a surrogate measure of liquid absorption. Airway liquid hyper-absorption is a key aspect of CF lung disease that would be expected to correct rapidly after administration of a successful therapy. In vivo pilot studies of this technique have been previously performed at our center [1]. Here we report the results of in vitro studies performed to better define the mechanism underpinning our method and define its utility and limitations.


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmail
    Thesis AdvisorCorcoran, Timothy ECorcoranTE@upmc.edu
    Committee MemberParker, Robert SRParker@engr.pitt.edu
    Committee MemberEnick, Robert Menick@engr.pitt.edu
    Committee MemberLittle, Steven Rsrlittle@pitt.edu
    Title: THERAPEUTIC DEVELOPMENT FOR CYSTIC FIBROSIS
    Status: Published
    Abstract: This thesis considers the aspects of therapeutics development for Cystic Fibrosis (CF). The studies are directed at the development of a new therapeutic outcome measurement for evaluating the performance of CF medications. This imaging-based outcome measures the absorption of a small-molecular radiopharmaceutical, Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) from the airways as a surrogate measure of liquid absorption. Airway liquid hyper-absorption is a key aspect of CF lung disease that would be expected to correct rapidly after administration of a successful therapy. In vivo pilot studies of this technique have been previously performed at our center [1]. Here we report the results of in vitro studies performed to better define the mechanism underpinning our method and define its utility and limitations.
    Date: 02 February 2012
    Date Type: Publication
    Defense Date: 13 July 2011
    Approval Date: 02 February 2012
    Submission Date: 09 November 2011
    Release Date: 02 February 2012
    Access Restriction: No restriction; The work is available for access worldwide immediately.
    Patent pending: No
    Number of Pages: 44
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: MS - Master of Science
    Uncontrolled Keywords: DTPA, biomarkers, CF
    Schools and Programs: Swanson School of Engineering > Chemical Engineering
    Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2012 08:42
    Last Modified: 16 Jul 2014 17:03

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