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AN ANALYSIS OF SIX SIGMA AT SMALL VS. LARGE MANUFACTURNING COMPANIES

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Adeyemi, Yewande (2005) AN ANALYSIS OF SIX SIGMA AT SMALL VS. LARGE MANUFACTURNING COMPANIES. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Six Sigma, is a business strategy using quality improvement tool, began in the 1980's. An important problem in business has been how to implement Six Sigma at small sized companies. Many large companies are beginning to mandate Six Sigma to their supply base (smaller manufacturing companies) as a condition of future business. This is a problem because Six Sigma implementation can require millions of dollars in investment, dedication of the best resources and training of many employees in a business. Many small manufacturing companies do not have this time or the financial resources to invest in the long-term benefits of Six Sigma. Yet, there still exists a need to implement Six Sigma in these smaller companiesThis study will analyze the performance of large and small manufacturing companies deploying Six Sigma. The objective is to determine whether the long-term benefits of Six Sigma programs are really worth the cost investment for smaller manufacturing companies. Quantitative and qualitative measurements are used as variables for comparison. The reported revenue, costs and savings of five Fortune 500 companies who have implemented and managed successful Six Sigma programs are examined. A data collection instrument is developed to study the small manufacturing companies. Results show that there were apparent challenges in Six Sigma deployment regardless of company size. However, the benefits of Six Sigma deployment at small manufacturing companies were very apparent. Through the research it was found that small manufacturing companies have the capacity to implement successful Six Sigma programs. Recommendations for further study and an increased research population is also suggested for future research.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Adeyemi, Yewandeyewande81@yahoo.com
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairNeedy, Kim La Scolakneedy@engr.pitt.eduKNEEDY
Committee MemberWolfe, Harveyhwolfe@engr.pitt.eduHWOLFE
Committee MemberBesterfield-Sacre, Mary Embsacre@engr.pitt.eduMBSACRE
Date: 21 June 2005
Date Type: Completion
Defense Date: 15 December 2004
Approval Date: 21 June 2005
Submission Date: 29 March 2005
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Swanson School of Engineering > Industrial Engineering
Degree: MSIE - Master of Science in Industrial Engineering
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Manufacturing; Six Sigma
Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-03292005-140003/, etd-03292005-140003
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 19:33
Last Modified: 19 Dec 2016 14:35
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/6631

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