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USE OF ABANDONED MINE DRAINAGE SOLIDS FOR THE CONTROL OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

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Sun, Wei (2009) USE OF ABANDONED MINE DRAINAGE SOLIDS FOR THE CONTROL OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Abandoned mine drainage (AMD) solids were evaluated for their ability to capture mercury from the flue gas of coal fired power plants. A fixed bed system was used to test Hg adsorption and oxidation by this material in a typical simulated flue gas. Fixed-bed tests showed that abandoned mine drainage from three mines displayed considerable capability for absorbing and oxidizing Hg0. Among all the flue gas components, HCl showed the greatest impact on Hg capture in the fixed-bed test, while O2 was shown to be not as important. A decrease in mercury capture and oxidation was observed when SO2 and NO2 were added to the flue gas. The addition of SO2 and NO prohibited mercury uptake but showed no impact on Hg oxidation. An entrained flow system was utilized to test mercury removal efficiency when abandoned mine drainage solids were injected into the flue gas. Four different AMD solids were tested using both eastern coal and PRB coal flue gas. Results showed that one AMD sample achieved about 80% Hg removal at the solids injection rate of 0.39 g/m3 injection rate. Mercury removal efficiency with other AMD samples under the identical conditions ranged from 25%~50%. Thus, this material shows great potential as a novel sorbent on Hg emission control technology. Moreover, Hg removal efficiency was found to be positively related to the iron content of AMD solids. Therefore, AMD solids with high iron content would be more desirable as mercury removal sorbent. The foam index test was also performed using this material to study the possible effect of AMD solids on the application of fly ash in concrete making, which is the main disadvantage of activated carbon injection technology. The test results indicated that all AMD samples used in this study would not have any adverse effect on the fly ash with regards to its application for concrete making.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Sun, Weiwes28@pitt.eduWES28
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairVidic, Radisav Dvidic@pitt.eduVIDIC
Committee MemberMonnell, Jason Djdm49@pitt.eduJDM49
Committee MemberCasson, Leonard Wcasson@pitt.eduCASSON
Date: 29 June 2009
Date Type: Completion
Defense Date: 2 April 2009
Approval Date: 29 June 2009
Submission Date: 30 March 2009
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Swanson School of Engineering > Civil and Environmental Engineering
Degree: MSCE - Master of Science in Civil Engineering
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Flue gas; Mercury adsorption; Mercury oxidation; Mercury removal; Abandoned mine drainage; Injection
Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-03302009-150750/, etd-03302009-150750
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 19:33
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 13:37
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/6653

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