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ASSESSING THE FEASIBILTY AND EDUCATIONAL IMPACT OF PROVIDING SICKLE CELL DISEASE EDUCTION IN BARBERSHOPS AND SALONS IN THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY

Rajakaruna, Cecilia Maryann (2009) ASSESSING THE FEASIBILTY AND EDUCATIONAL IMPACT OF PROVIDING SICKLE CELL DISEASE EDUCTION IN BARBERSHOPS AND SALONS IN THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a severe autosomal recessive blood disorder that affects around 1 in 500 African Americans in the United States. Approximately, 1 in 12 African Americans are carriers of sickle cell trait (SCT). The high prevalence of sickle cell trait carriers highlights the importance of having education and trait testing available for individuals, particularly those, who are of childbearing age. Misconceptions and misinformation about sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait can be the reason for an individual to not be motivated to get sickle cell trait testing. This study was created to provide education to the African American community. A pre-post survey research design was used to evaluate 1) knowledge acquisition and retention among study participants who received genetic counseling in the barbershop and beauty salon; and 2) the feasibility of delivering a health education module on sickle cell disease in barbershops and salons in the African American community. As a result of this project, knowledge of sickle cell disease, concern over trait testing, and attitudes toward receiving genetic counseling in a non-clinical setting were evaluated. The data collected suggested that there was significant knowledge gain in 7 of the 9 knowledge questions administered with a p-value <0.05. Concern about trait testing remained low for both the pre and post questionnaires. Attitude about trait testing and genetic counseling remained high for both the pre and post questionnaires as well, resulting in an overall supportive attitude about trait testing and genetic counseling. The mean amount of knowledge gain overall knowledge questions were evaluated using a paired t-test with significance (p<0.05). Overall knowledge gain had a significance of (p<0.001). The public health relevance from the results of this study can inform development of health education materials on genetic disorders common in the African American community. Medical and public health professionals can use the insights gained from this study to provide better education and outreach to the community through non-clinical settings in the community.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Rajakaruna, Cecilia Maryanncmr68@pitt.edu, ceciliarajakaruna@yahoo.comCMR68
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairGettig, Elizabeth Annebgettig@pitt.eduBGETTIG
Committee MemberKammerer, Candace Mariecmk3@pitt.eduCMK3
Committee MemberKrishnamurti, Lakshmananlak3@pitt.eduLAK3
Committee MemberBrowne, Mario Curtismcb15@pitt.eduMCB15
Committee MemberThomas, Stephen Bsbthomas@cmh.pitt.edu
Date: 29 June 2009
Date Type: Completion
Defense Date: 24 March 2009
Approval Date: 29 June 2009
Submission Date: 6 April 2009
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Genetic Counseling
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: barbershops; beauty salons; community outreach; genetic counseling; genetic education; sickle cell disease; sickle cell trait
Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-04062009-154814/, etd-04062009-154814
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 19:34
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 13:38
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/6825

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