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Familial correlation in dental caries and periodontal disease: indicators and risk factors

Moeller, Jennifer Rose (2009) Familial correlation in dental caries and periodontal disease: indicators and risk factors. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

RESEARCH AIMS: Many studies have identified an association between cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease. Awareness is growing that oral health is important in an individual's general health. There is evidence suggesting that oral conditions, such as dental caries and periodontal disease, are due to bacteria contained in plaque and treatable, possibly preventable conditions. The aims of this study are 1) determine if there is a familial correlation in the ability to host supragingival and subgingival bacteria, 2) determine familiality in the development of dental caries and periodontal disease, and 3) if there is a familial correlation, propose modifications to the oral health hygiene standard of care that may influence the development of oral disease, which in turn may lower the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.METHODS: Data were obtained from the COHRA study (IRB #020773 and #0506048). Participants (n = 2,570) contacted the study coordinator and attended a clinic at which DNA samples were obtained, dental examinations were performed, and questionnaires were completed. FCOR, a S.A.G.E. statistical program, was used to analyze the data and determine the familial correlation between relative pair-types.RESULTS: The influences of environment and genetic make-up in regards to oral health, specifically the ability to host bacteria and the development of dental caries and periodontal disease, are complex. The correlations of all pair-types were similar and likely overlap when the standard error is considered.CONCLUSION: Results suggested that there was no strong evidence of a genetic influence on the ability to host supragingival or subgingival bacteria or the development of dental caries or periodontal disease. However, the amount of influence environment and genetic factors have in the development of oral disease remains unclear.PUBLIC HEALTH SIGNIFICANCE: The relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease is not understood. A continuated attempt to understand the components of oral disease status and its influence on cardiovascular disease may provide an avenue by which to decrease an individual's risk to develop cardiovascular disease.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Moeller, Jennifer RoseJennifer.R.Moeller@gmail.com
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairFeingold, Eleanorfeingold@pitt.eduFEINGOLD
Committee CoChairMarazita, Marymarazita@pitt.eduMARAZITA
Committee MemberCuenco, Karenktc14@pitt.eduKTC14
Committee MemberWeyant, Robertrjw1@pitt.eduRJW1
Date: 29 June 2009
Date Type: Completion
Defense Date: 30 March 2009
Approval Date: 29 June 2009
Submission Date: 8 April 2009
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Genetic Counseling
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: familial correlation; oral health; periodontal disease; cardiovascular disease; dental caries
Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-04082009-101801/, etd-04082009-101801
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 19:35
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 13:39
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/6898

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