Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

The Duquesne Emergency Preparedness Project: An Examination of Existing Citizen Preparedness Guides and an Exploration of Community Perceptions and Emergency Preparedness Needs

Delestienne, Emilie Hoffman (2008) The Duquesne Emergency Preparedness Project: An Examination of Existing Citizen Preparedness Guides and an Exploration of Community Perceptions and Emergency Preparedness Needs. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

[img]
Preview
PDF
Primary Text

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Vulnerable populations and communities lacking resources may be disproportionately affected in the event of a public health emergency. Preexisting social conditions among vulnerable populations including low socioeconomic status and poor educational systems, contribute to the vulnerability of communities in the face of disaster. The Duquesne City, Pennsylvania community is a vulnerable population likely to be disproportionately affected in the event of an emergency. The primary objectives for the Duquesne Emergency Preparedness Project were to: 1) Examine the literacy level and assumptions underlying existing preparedness guides; 2) Define risk perceptions and understand information-seeking behaviors of residents in Duquesne, PA; 3) Better understand the challenges faced by low-resource populations in utilizing emergency preparedness materials and use this understanding to make recommendations for the development of educational preparedness materials and a community-based model for emergency preparedness. The literacy level and assumptions underlying existing emergency preparedness educational guides were assessed and evaluated for their relevance for the Duquesne community. In order to make recommendations for the development of emergency preparedness educational materials relevant to low literacy and resource poor communities, the Project also investigated the risk perceptions and information seeking behaviors of Duquesne community members and explored existing strengths, weaknesses and perceived individual and community emergency capabilities through focus group discussions and surveying. Study conclusions include: 1) People in Duquesne and surrounding areas do not view emergencies or disasters as impending high-risk events; 2) A serious communication disconnect exists between local officials, agencies and the public; and 3) Individuals are largely unfamiliar with existing citizen preparedness materials, perhaps because this information has not percolated into these communities, tends to focus on low-probability and abstract events, exceeds the literacy level of these populations and is not consistent with the needs of vulnerable populations. A paucity of information on the emergency preparedness needs of low-resource populations exist in the literature and understanding these needs is essential for community-based public health preparedness. Conclusions of the Duquesne Emergency Preparedness Project reveal important insights about the emergency preparedness needs of vulnerable populations and have important implications for public health approaches to preparedness for low-resource communities.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Delestienne, Emilie Hoffmanehdelestienne@yahoo.com
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairTerry, Martha Annmaterry@pitt.eduMATERRY
Committee MemberDocumet, Patricia Ipdocumet@pitt.eduPDOCUMET
Committee MemberSharma, Ravi Krks1946@pitt.eduRKS1946
Committee MemberStebbins, Samuelstebbinss@edc.pitt.edu
Date: 27 June 2008
Date Type: Completion
Defense Date: 2 April 2008
Approval Date: 27 June 2008
Submission Date: 10 April 2008
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Behavioral and Community Health Sciences
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: emergency preparedness; public health preparedness; risk perceptions
Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-04102008-102452/, etd-04102008-102452
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 19:35
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 13:39
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/6959

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item