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AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE UTILITY OF SELF-REPORTED PAIN AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR PATIENTS WITH PANCREATITIS.

Marshall, Megan L (2006) AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE UTILITY OF SELF-REPORTED PAIN AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR PATIENTS WITH PANCREATITIS. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Hereditary pancreatitis is characterized by episodes of pancreatic inflammation accompanied by unrelenting abdominal pain, usually beginning in childhood. Therefore, this emerging population of individuals is affected with a chronic pain condition affecting global quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach, including psychosocial and behavioral factors, is necessary to elicit responses to and treat chronic pain. Improving overall quality of life is an important outcome of interventions for chronic conditions. Health-related quality of life reflects an individual's physical and mental well-being. This study documents the pain levels and quality of life of individuals with both hereditary and sporadic pancreatitis. Data from 73 individuals with hereditary pancreatitis and 271 individuals with sporadic pancreatitis who participated in the Hereditary Pancreatitis Study and the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 were examined for this study. The questionnaires addressed each subject's report of quality of life, severity and duration of pain, alcohol use, tobacco use, and diagnosis of diabetes. Patient responses were analyzed using a battery of comparative analyses. The SF-122 health survey was analyzed using an algorithm for standardizing and weighting the physical and mental health scores. Pain and quality of life measures were compared to each other, as well as to several commonly measured environmental influences on health using correlation analysis, regression analysis, and the Mann-Whitney U test. As hypothesized, individuals with familial pancreatitis reported worse pain and poorer overall quality of life than individuals with sporadic pancreatitis. Factors influencing the measure of pain include the duration, severity, frequency, and character. Other findings include correlations between (a) physical quality of life and gender, smoking, and alcohol, (b) pain and age, and (c) pain frequency and tobacco and alcohol use. This study provides information that can potentially assist health care professionals who work with individuals with pancreatitis and chronic pain, and who are assessing the necessity of psychosocial intervention or support services.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Marshall, Megan Lmegmpsu@yahoo.com
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairBarmada, M Michaelmbarmada@hgen.pitt.eduBARMADA
Committee MemberWhitcomb, David Cwhitcomb@dom.pitt.edu)
Committee MemberFink, Erinfinke@upmc.edu
Committee MemberWilson, Johnwilson@nsabp.pitt.eduJWW
Date: 26 June 2006
Date Type: Completion
Defense Date: 6 April 2006
Approval Date: 26 June 2006
Submission Date: 11 April 2006
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Genetic Counseling
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Genetics; Pain; Pancreatitis; Quality of Life
Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-04112006-122316/, etd-04112006-122316
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 19:35
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 13:39
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/6990

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