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DO BASELINE MEASURES OF INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY HEALTH PREDICT ACTIVITY LEVELS IN AFRICAN AMERICANS?

Watson, Melissa Anne (2008) DO BASELINE MEASURES OF INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY HEALTH PREDICT ACTIVITY LEVELS IN AFRICAN AMERICANS? Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Increased physical activity is associated with decreased risk for several chronic diseases, including hypertension and diabetes. Although African Americans are at increased risk for these conditions, there is little knowledge about factors that influence physical activity in this population. We investigated whether physical activity could be predicted by baseline variables including: demographic, medical, anthropometric, fitness, stress and family health factors.<br><br>METHODS: Of 1,879 participants (85% female, median age = 51) from the Healthy Black Family Project who completed a baseline fitness assessment and questionnaire over an 18-month period, 988 attended at least one exercise class (active group) and 891 never attended an exercise class (non-active group). Of all 1,879 participants, 98 individuals also completed a family history with a genetic counseling student three months before or after their initial assessment. Multiple linear regression, t-tests, and chi-squared analyses were conducted to test for effects on activity level and differences between groups.<br><br>RESULTS: In the active group, the average number of exercise classes attended was 14. Analyses indicated that increased activity was significantly correlated with increased percent body fat (p = 0.001), decreased BMI (p = 0.028) and decreased flexibility (p = 0.088). In the top quartile of the active group, family history of diabetes (p = 0.006) and personal history of cardiovascular concerns (p = 0.016) predicted activity. These findings accounted for 2 and 5.3% of variation in activity, respectively. There were many significant findings between the non-active and active groups, indicating that individuals in poorer health and at greater risk for disease tend to be more active. Individuals who completed a family history risk assessment were also more likely to be active.<br><br>CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that baseline physical measurements as well as individual and family health variables are correlated with activity levels in African Americans. Dynamics of the Healthy Black Family Project likely contribute to at-risk individuals being more active.<br><br>IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: Community intervention programs targeting African Americans at high risk for chronic disease aim to reduce health disparities. Identifying factors that influence physical activity among this population will enable interventions to tailor services to encourage activity and reduce risk for disease.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Watson, Melissa Annemelissaw57@hotmail.com
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairThomas, Stephen Bsbthomas@cmh.pitt.edu
Committee MemberFord, Angelaafford@cmh.pitt.edu
Committee MemberKammerer, Candacecmk3@pitt.eduCMK3
Committee MemberGettig, Elizabeth Abgettig@pitt.eduBGETTIG
Committee MemberGrubs, Robin Ergrubs@pitt.eduRGRUBS
Date: 26 June 2008
Date Type: Completion
Defense Date: 31 March 2008
Approval Date: 26 June 2008
Submission Date: 11 April 2008
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Genetic Counseling
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: African Americans; Family Health History; Physical Activity
Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-04112008-165811/, etd-04112008-165811
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 19:35
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 13:39
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/7014

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