Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

AN ANALYTIC APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING VARIATIONS IN PERCEPTIONS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE BETWEEN THE ICUs OF A SINGLE INSTITUTION

Miller, Rachel G (2005) AN ANALYTIC APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING VARIATIONS IN PERCEPTIONS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE BETWEEN THE ICUs OF A SINGLE INSTITUTION. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

[img]
Preview
PDF
Primary Text

Download (686kB) | Preview

Abstract

Organizational culture has been shown to be associated with intensive care unit job performance and patient outcomes. These findings have led to recommendations to improve the safety climate in ICUs. While ICUs within a single hospital may be expected to have similar climates, previous research has pointed to variations between ICUs. Also, ICU directors' assessments of their personnel's experiences may not be accurate. The purpose of this thesis was to determine whether variations in organizational culture exist between the ICUs of a single institution and between different types of personnel, as well as to assess the accuracy of ICU directors'perceptions of personnel attitudes.The personnel of four ICUs within a single hospital were surveyed using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire - ICU, which was designed to assess organizational culture across six factors: teamwork climate, perceptions of management, safety climate, stress recognition, job satisfaction, and work environment. Mean and percent positive scores (percentage of scores greater than or equal to 75 on a 0-100 point scale) were calculated for each ICU and for each job type across ICUs. Generalized estimating equations were used to model each factor score by job type while accounting for a possible clustering effect due to ICU membership. Directors were asked to estimate their personnel's mean factor scores and differences between director estimates and actual scores were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Scores were found to differ significantly across ICUs for all factors except stress recognition. Scores for job satisfaction, perceptions of management, and working conditions were found to differ significantly between physicians and nurses. ICU directors tended to overestimate the attitudes of their personnel, however the overestimation was not found to be significant. The results suggest that assessments based on hospital level analysis or director opinion may not be sufficient. It is seemingly important to account for differences between ICUs, as well as between personnel types, when creating policies affecting organizational culture. The public health relevance of this thesis is in determining a unit of analysis for organizational culture assessments to improve job performance of ICU personnel, and subsequently, to hopefully improve patient outcomes.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Miller, Rachel Grgkst12@pitt.eduRGKST12
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairWeissfeld, Lisalweis@pitt.eduLWEIS
Committee MemberAngus, Derek
Committee MemberKong, Lanlkong@pitt.eduLKONG
Date: 14 June 2005
Date Type: Completion
Defense Date: 7 April 2005
Approval Date: 14 June 2005
Submission Date: 13 April 2005
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Biostatistics
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: GEE; patient safety; personnel attitudes
Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-04132005-190309/, etd-04132005-190309
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 19:36
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 13:39
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/7093

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item