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THE REPRESENTATION OF OTHER CULTURES IN AWARD-WINNING PICTUREBOOKS FROM THE UNITED STATES, AUSTRALIA, AND GREAT BRITAIN(1960-2009)

Hall, Virginia (2011) THE REPRESENTATION OF OTHER CULTURES IN AWARD-WINNING PICTUREBOOKS FROM THE UNITED STATES, AUSTRALIA, AND GREAT BRITAIN(1960-2009). Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the representation of other cultures in award-winning picture books from the United States, Australia, and Great Britain between 1960 and 2009. Not only was the cultural content of children's literature over the past fifty years investigated, but the protocol created to evaluate the books was a newly devised instrument that focused on the educational application of the content in the books. The protocol included three levels of analysis of the award-winning picture books. The Level I Analysis determined which books depicted other cultures; that is, cultures that were different from the cultures in the country in which the book was originally published. The Level II Analysis investigated the type of cultural representation found in the books, including depictions of geographic location, social systems, economic systems, and/or political systems. The final analysis (Level III Analysis) identified the genres and themes found in the picture books. Of the 143 books read for this study, only 25 (17%) depicted information about cultures different from those in the country in which the book was originally published. Books from the 2000s had the least amount of cultural representation. Geographic location was the cultural element most often represented in the picture books. Political systems had the least amount of representations in the books. This study addresses the potential for using children's literature as a medium for cross-cultural awareness and the importance of providing teachers with appropriate tools to critically analyze books with cultural content. Study results might be interpreted as an indication that there is a need for more picture books to be representative of all people and cultures.


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    Creators/Authors:
    CreatorsEmailORCID
    Hall, Virginiavhj1@pitt.edu
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmailORCID
    Committee ChairKucan, Linda
    Committee MemberMeyers, John
    Committee MemberGubar, Marah
    Committee MemberCrawford, Patricia
    Title: THE REPRESENTATION OF OTHER CULTURES IN AWARD-WINNING PICTUREBOOKS FROM THE UNITED STATES, AUSTRALIA, AND GREAT BRITAIN(1960-2009)
    Status: Unpublished
    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the representation of other cultures in award-winning picture books from the United States, Australia, and Great Britain between 1960 and 2009. Not only was the cultural content of children's literature over the past fifty years investigated, but the protocol created to evaluate the books was a newly devised instrument that focused on the educational application of the content in the books. The protocol included three levels of analysis of the award-winning picture books. The Level I Analysis determined which books depicted other cultures; that is, cultures that were different from the cultures in the country in which the book was originally published. The Level II Analysis investigated the type of cultural representation found in the books, including depictions of geographic location, social systems, economic systems, and/or political systems. The final analysis (Level III Analysis) identified the genres and themes found in the picture books. Of the 143 books read for this study, only 25 (17%) depicted information about cultures different from those in the country in which the book was originally published. Books from the 2000s had the least amount of cultural representation. Geographic location was the cultural element most often represented in the picture books. Political systems had the least amount of representations in the books. This study addresses the potential for using children's literature as a medium for cross-cultural awareness and the importance of providing teachers with appropriate tools to critically analyze books with cultural content. Study results might be interpreted as an indication that there is a need for more picture books to be representative of all people and cultures.
    Date: 13 May 2011
    Date Type: Completion
    Defense Date: 31 March 2011
    Approval Date: 13 May 2011
    Submission Date: 20 April 2011
    Access Restriction: No restriction; The work is available for access worldwide immediately.
    Patent pending: No
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: EdD - Doctor of Education
    URN: etd-04202011-092604
    Uncontrolled Keywords: children's literature; content analysis; cultural awareness
    Schools and Programs: School of Education > Instruction and Learning
    Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 14:39
    Last Modified: 23 May 2012 15:39
    Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-04202011-092604/, etd-04202011-092604

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