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THE EFFECT OF BREAKFAST CONSUMPTION ON THE ACUTE RESPONSE OF PLASMA ACYLATED-GHRELIN AND GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE 1 CONCENTRATIONS IN ADULT WOMEN

Hritz, Thomas A. (2011) THE EFFECT OF BREAKFAST CONSUMPTION ON THE ACUTE RESPONSE OF PLASMA ACYLATED-GHRELIN AND GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE 1 CONCENTRATIONS IN ADULT WOMEN. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    Introduction: A recommended strategy to influence energy balance, which may influence body weight regulation, is to eat breakfast regularly. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of breakfast consumption versus a non-breakfast condition on concentrations of the appetite-regulating hormones acylated ghrelin (AG) and glucacon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), daily energy intake, and subjective ratings of hunger in women. Methods: This randomized crossover trial recruited a total of 18 normal weight, overweight, and obese women (age 26.3 ± 6.0 years; BMI 26.8 ± 5.9 kg/m2). Each participant reported to the research center on two mornings following a minimum 12-hour fast to undergo one of two experimental condtions: breakfast consumption that provided 20% of their estimated daily energy needs, or a waiting period with no breakfast. Study visits were separated by at least 3 days. At each experimental session, participants provided blood samples to measure plasma AG and GLP-1 concentrations and visual analogue scale (VAS) questionnaires to measure subjective hunger and satiety ratings prior to each testing condition (baseline) and at 30, 60, and 120 minutes after each testing condition. Participants also self-reported discretionary intake for the remainder of each testing day in a food and physical activity diary. Results: Following breakfast consumption compared to the non-breakfast condition, AG was significantly lower and GLP-1 was significantly higher at the 30-, 60-, and 120-minute time points (P < 0.001, each), but there was no difference in total daily energy intake between conditions (P = 0.199). In addition, subjective ratings of hunger significantly correlated with energy intake following the breakfast consumption condition (P < 0.05) but not following the non-breakfast condition. Subjective ratings of hunger did not correlate with AG or GLP-1 concentrations. Conclusion: Even though a significant acute hormonal response was observed following breakfast consumption when compared to a non-breakfast condition, total daily energy intake between conditions was not significantly different. Thus, further studies are needed to understand the influence of breakfast consumption on energy balance and body weight regulation.


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmail
    Committee ChairJakicic, John Mjjakicic@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberRickman, Amyarickman@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberHelsel, Dianedih1@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberEvans, Rhobert Wevansr@edc.pitt.edu
    Title: THE EFFECT OF BREAKFAST CONSUMPTION ON THE ACUTE RESPONSE OF PLASMA ACYLATED-GHRELIN AND GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE 1 CONCENTRATIONS IN ADULT WOMEN
    Status: Unpublished
    Abstract: Introduction: A recommended strategy to influence energy balance, which may influence body weight regulation, is to eat breakfast regularly. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of breakfast consumption versus a non-breakfast condition on concentrations of the appetite-regulating hormones acylated ghrelin (AG) and glucacon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), daily energy intake, and subjective ratings of hunger in women. Methods: This randomized crossover trial recruited a total of 18 normal weight, overweight, and obese women (age 26.3 ± 6.0 years; BMI 26.8 ± 5.9 kg/m2). Each participant reported to the research center on two mornings following a minimum 12-hour fast to undergo one of two experimental condtions: breakfast consumption that provided 20% of their estimated daily energy needs, or a waiting period with no breakfast. Study visits were separated by at least 3 days. At each experimental session, participants provided blood samples to measure plasma AG and GLP-1 concentrations and visual analogue scale (VAS) questionnaires to measure subjective hunger and satiety ratings prior to each testing condition (baseline) and at 30, 60, and 120 minutes after each testing condition. Participants also self-reported discretionary intake for the remainder of each testing day in a food and physical activity diary. Results: Following breakfast consumption compared to the non-breakfast condition, AG was significantly lower and GLP-1 was significantly higher at the 30-, 60-, and 120-minute time points (P < 0.001, each), but there was no difference in total daily energy intake between conditions (P = 0.199). In addition, subjective ratings of hunger significantly correlated with energy intake following the breakfast consumption condition (P < 0.05) but not following the non-breakfast condition. Subjective ratings of hunger did not correlate with AG or GLP-1 concentrations. Conclusion: Even though a significant acute hormonal response was observed following breakfast consumption when compared to a non-breakfast condition, total daily energy intake between conditions was not significantly different. Thus, further studies are needed to understand the influence of breakfast consumption on energy balance and body weight regulation.
    Date: 13 May 2011
    Date Type: Completion
    Defense Date: 22 April 2011
    Approval Date: 13 May 2011
    Submission Date: 25 April 2011
    Access Restriction: No restriction; The work is available for access worldwide immediately.
    Patent pending: No
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
    URN: etd-04252011-191633
    Uncontrolled Keywords: anorexigenic; weight maintenance; energy balance; orexigenic
    Schools and Programs: School of Education > Health, Physical, Recreational Education
    Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 14:42
    Last Modified: 05 Jun 2012 10:38
    Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-04252011-191633/, etd-04252011-191633

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