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As the Den Turns: Pack Status as an Emergent Property of Interpack Mating Alliances and Occupation of Territory among Wolves in Yellowstone National Park, 1995-2000

Appelt, Cathleen Jane (2002) As the Den Turns: Pack Status as an Emergent Property of Interpack Mating Alliances and Occupation of Territory among Wolves in Yellowstone National Park, 1995-2000. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    This project represents a social scientific investigation of the emergence of patterned relations among wolf packs in a colonizing wolf population. Data analyzed were collected by the National Parks Service's Wolf Project. The formation of structurally endogamous mating alliances is explored using P-Graph methodology and Parente Suite software programs. Qualitative techniques were also employed to explore the social structure among wolf packs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Findings suggest that a multi-level social organization exists among YNP wolves.


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmail
    Committee ChairDoreian, Patrickpitpat@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberHummon, Norman Pnph@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberGrannis, Richardrdg25@cornell.edu
    Committee MemberFararo, Thomas Jtjf2@pitt.edu
    Title: As the Den Turns: Pack Status as an Emergent Property of Interpack Mating Alliances and Occupation of Territory among Wolves in Yellowstone National Park, 1995-2000
    Status: Unpublished
    Abstract: This project represents a social scientific investigation of the emergence of patterned relations among wolf packs in a colonizing wolf population. Data analyzed were collected by the National Parks Service's Wolf Project. The formation of structurally endogamous mating alliances is explored using P-Graph methodology and Parente Suite software programs. Qualitative techniques were also employed to explore the social structure among wolf packs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Findings suggest that a multi-level social organization exists among YNP wolves.
    Date: 01 August 2002
    Date Type: Completion
    Defense Date: 10 January 2002
    Approval Date: 01 August 2002
    Submission Date: 05 May 2002
    Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
    Patent pending: No
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
    URN: etd-05052002-220759
    Uncontrolled Keywords: canis lupus; gray wolf; gray wolves; non-human social structure; polygamous mating; relinking; wolf sociology
    Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Sociology
    Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 14:43
    Last Modified: 06 Jun 2012 10:53
    Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu:80/ETD/available/etd-05052002-220759/, etd-05052002-220759

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