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THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SELF-EFFICACY AND CLINICAL RISK FACTORS IN THE BYPASS ANGIOPLASTY REVASCULARIZATION INVESTIGATION 2 DIABETES (BARI 2D) STUDY

Sansing, Veronica Vera (2008) THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SELF-EFFICACY AND CLINICAL RISK FACTORS IN THE BYPASS ANGIOPLASTY REVASCULARIZATION INVESTIGATION 2 DIABETES (BARI 2D) STUDY. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Objectives: Although prior research has shown that self-efficacy (SE), the belief that one has the ability to create change through behaviors, is associated with better clinical outcomes for Type 2 diabetes (DM) and coronary artery disease separately (CAD), little research has examined the role of SE in patients with both DM and CAD. The goal of this cross-sectional analysis was to describe the association between SE and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and low density lipids (LDL) in patients with comorbid CAD and DM. In addition, this analysis examined the demographic and clinical factors that are associated with SE in the management of DM and CAD.Methods: Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted with 1,447 patients in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) study who completed a self-efficacy assessment. Only patients recruited at U.S. sites were included in the analyses. The majority of the patients were White non-Hispanic, male, and had a post high school education. The average age at enrollment was 63 years. The models were adjusted for sex, age, race/ethnicity, and education.Results: Better HbA1c was positively associated with SE, even after adjusting for race/ethnicity, age, sex, and education. Better SBP was positively associated with SE, however this association was only marginally significant when adjusting for race/ethnicity, age, sex, and education. LDL was not associated with SE. Hispanic ethnicity, history of congestive heart failure, number of hypertension drugs, probable neuropathy, and insulin use were factors negatively associated with SE. A post high school education and history of cancer were positively associated with SE. Conclusions: Psychosocial factors, such as self-efficacy, are of public health significance because they play a considerable role in the management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Self-efficacy was positively associated with better cardiac and diabetic factors in the BARI 2D population. Literacy skills, cardiac history, number of medications, and neuropathy are several other factors doctors should take into consideration when assessing and building up patients' confidence in being able to manage their medical conditions.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Sansing, Veronica Veravvs3@pitt.eduVVS3
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairRichardson, Gale Agar@pitt.eduGAR
Committee MemberBrooks, Maria Mori
Committee MemberDay, Nancynday@pitt.eduNDAY
Committee MemberThomas, Stephen Bsbthomas@cmh.pitt.edu
Date: 26 June 2008
Date Type: Completion
Defense Date: 25 January 2008
Approval Date: 26 June 2008
Submission Date: 15 May 2008
Access Restriction: 5 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 5 years.
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: cardiovascular; diabetes; self-efficacy
Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-05152008-175057/, etd-05152008-175057
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 19:44
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 13:43
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/7881

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