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Investigating the Relationship Between FAI Questionnaires and Measures of Static and Dynamic Postural Stability

Pederson, Jonathan (2011) Investigating the Relationship Between FAI Questionnaires and Measures of Static and Dynamic Postural Stability. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    Lateral ankle sprains are a common injury among all levels of athletic competition and can lead to the development of functional ankle instability (FAI). Individuals with FAI often display postural stability deficits. Numerous ankle questionnaires have been developed to classify subjects with FAI; however, the relationship between ankle questionnaires and postural stability is limited and warrants investigation. The primary purpose of this study was to compare measures of static and dynamic postural stability between FAI and healthy controls. The secondary purpose was to identify the relationship between ankle questionnaires and postural stability in FAI subjects. A total of 24 recreationally active subjects, 12 FAI and 12 healthy controls, between the ages of 18-35 were recruited to participate in this study. Static postural stability was assessed during eyes open and eyes closed single-leg stance. Dynamic postural stability was assessed during single-leg jump landings in the anterior and lateral directions. The ankle questionnaires included the Functional Ankle Disability Index, Ankle Instability Instrument, Ankle Joint Functional Assessment Tool, and Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Demographic, postural stability and questionnaire variables were compared using independent samples t-tests. A series of Pearson correlation coefficients were computed to determine the relationship between ankle questionnaires and measures of static and dynamic postural stability. The FAI subjects demonstrated worse (greater perceived symptoms of functional instability) scores on the Functional Ankle Disability Index-Sport, Ankle Instability Instrument, Ankle Joint Functional Assessment Tool, and Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool than the healthy controls. Additionally, FAI subjects demonstrated worse (higher) scores for the medial/lateral ground reaction force standard deviation during eyes closed single-leg stance, vertical stability index, and DPSI during anterior and lateral jumps. Significant correlations were observed between the medial lateral stability index and Ankle Joint Functional Assessment Tool and Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool during lateral jumps. The results of the study demonstrate FAI subjects have static and dynamic postural stability deficits compared to healthy controls. Additionally, the ankle questionnaires were poorly correlated with static and dynamic postural stability suggesting the ankle questionnaires may be inadequate at detecting postural stability deficits in FAI subjects.


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    Creators/Authors:
    CreatorsEmailORCID
    Pederson, Jonathanjjp44@pitt.edu
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmailORCID
    Committee ChairAbt, John P.jabt@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberStone, David A.stoneda@upmc.edu
    Committee MemberLovalekar, Mita T.mital@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberLephart, Scott M.lephart@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberSell, Timothy C.tcs15@pitt.edu
    Title: Investigating the Relationship Between FAI Questionnaires and Measures of Static and Dynamic Postural Stability
    Status: Unpublished
    Abstract: Lateral ankle sprains are a common injury among all levels of athletic competition and can lead to the development of functional ankle instability (FAI). Individuals with FAI often display postural stability deficits. Numerous ankle questionnaires have been developed to classify subjects with FAI; however, the relationship between ankle questionnaires and postural stability is limited and warrants investigation. The primary purpose of this study was to compare measures of static and dynamic postural stability between FAI and healthy controls. The secondary purpose was to identify the relationship between ankle questionnaires and postural stability in FAI subjects. A total of 24 recreationally active subjects, 12 FAI and 12 healthy controls, between the ages of 18-35 were recruited to participate in this study. Static postural stability was assessed during eyes open and eyes closed single-leg stance. Dynamic postural stability was assessed during single-leg jump landings in the anterior and lateral directions. The ankle questionnaires included the Functional Ankle Disability Index, Ankle Instability Instrument, Ankle Joint Functional Assessment Tool, and Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Demographic, postural stability and questionnaire variables were compared using independent samples t-tests. A series of Pearson correlation coefficients were computed to determine the relationship between ankle questionnaires and measures of static and dynamic postural stability. The FAI subjects demonstrated worse (greater perceived symptoms of functional instability) scores on the Functional Ankle Disability Index-Sport, Ankle Instability Instrument, Ankle Joint Functional Assessment Tool, and Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool than the healthy controls. Additionally, FAI subjects demonstrated worse (higher) scores for the medial/lateral ground reaction force standard deviation during eyes closed single-leg stance, vertical stability index, and DPSI during anterior and lateral jumps. Significant correlations were observed between the medial lateral stability index and Ankle Joint Functional Assessment Tool and Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool during lateral jumps. The results of the study demonstrate FAI subjects have static and dynamic postural stability deficits compared to healthy controls. Additionally, the ankle questionnaires were poorly correlated with static and dynamic postural stability suggesting the ankle questionnaires may be inadequate at detecting postural stability deficits in FAI subjects.
    Date: 15 September 2011
    Date Type: Completion
    Defense Date: 20 July 2011
    Approval Date: 15 September 2011
    Submission Date: 24 July 2011
    Access Restriction: No restriction; The work is available for access worldwide immediately.
    Patent pending: No
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: MS - Master of Science
    URN: etd-07242011-160338
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Chronic Ankle Instability; Functional Ankle Instability; Postural Stability; Questionnaires
    Schools and Programs: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences > Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
    Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 14:53
    Last Modified: 17 Feb 2012 15:49
    Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-07242011-160338/, etd-07242011-160338

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