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None But "We Heathen": Shaku Soen at the World's Parliament of Religions

Walters, Michael (2007) None But "We Heathen": Shaku Soen at the World's Parliament of Religions. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    The aftermath of the performance by the Japanese delegation at the World's Parliament of Religions in Chicago in 1893 has been well documented—it marked the beginning of the West's introduction to Japanese Buddhism. What has been less well documented is the intellectual background and influences that went into producing that performance, in particular the performance of the man who would eventually emerge as the delegation's most historically prominent member, Shaku Soen (1859-1919). This paper attempts to use Soen as a case study to examine the intellectual and political milieu which Japanese Buddhism helped to inform, and was informed by, during the Meiji Era (1868-1912). It draws upon established research, as well as primary sources (including Soen's own Parliament addresses, writings, and journals) in order to support this examination.


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmail
    Committee ChairChilson, Clarkchilson@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberMcDonald, Keikokeiko@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberSmethurst, Richardrsmet@pitt.edu
    Title: None But "We Heathen": Shaku Soen at the World's Parliament of Religions
    Status: Unpublished
    Abstract: The aftermath of the performance by the Japanese delegation at the World's Parliament of Religions in Chicago in 1893 has been well documented—it marked the beginning of the West's introduction to Japanese Buddhism. What has been less well documented is the intellectual background and influences that went into producing that performance, in particular the performance of the man who would eventually emerge as the delegation's most historically prominent member, Shaku Soen (1859-1919). This paper attempts to use Soen as a case study to examine the intellectual and political milieu which Japanese Buddhism helped to inform, and was informed by, during the Meiji Era (1868-1912). It draws upon established research, as well as primary sources (including Soen's own Parliament addresses, writings, and journals) in order to support this examination.
    Date: 19 September 2007
    Date Type: Completion
    Defense Date: 04 May 2007
    Approval Date: 19 September 2007
    Submission Date: 31 July 2007
    Access Restriction: No restriction; The work is available for access worldwide immediately.
    Patent pending: No
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: MA - Master of Arts
    URN: etd-07312007-094639
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Henry Steel Olcott; Imakita Kosen; Zen
    Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > East Asian Studies
    Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 14:55
    Last Modified: 06 Jun 2012 14:04
    Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-07312007-094639/, etd-07312007-094639

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