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DEVELOPMENT OF AN OPTIMAL PATIENT TRANSFER TASK SET AND SIMULATION-BASED INTERVENTION TO REDUCE MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURY IN HEALTHCARE WORKERS

O'Donnell, John M (2010) DEVELOPMENT OF AN OPTIMAL PATIENT TRANSFER TASK SET AND SIMULATION-BASED INTERVENTION TO REDUCE MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURY IN HEALTHCARE WORKERS. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Introduction: Occupational injury is recognized as a key attrition factor in nursing with musculoskeletal injury the most common cause. Nurses, nurse aides and orderly injury rates are consistently listed in the top ten US occupations in terms of total numbers of injuries with patient transfer a primary etiologic factor. Patient transfer education for trainees as well as employees remains inconsistent and non-standardized. Legislative and policy efforts have not been effective.Methods: Two methods are combined in this paper to approach the problem: hierarchical task analysis and a simulation educational intervention. Hierarchical task analysis has been used to solve industrial process problems for more than three decades and simulation education methods have been used in aviation since the 1920's. The hierarchical task analysis process is used to develop an optimal task set which was used to frame and implement a healthcare simulationtraining intervention.Results: Performance evaluation tools for patient transfer were developed based on the optimum task set. Transfer of simulation training outcomes to the clinical setting was demonstrated on pilot study intervention and control units. The program was implemented in a community hospital with sustained improvement in transfer skill and reduction of injury rates and lost work days.Conclusion: Because patient safety and improved outcomes are linked to adequate levels of nurse staffing, the public health implications of this project are significant. If nursing injury can be avoided using these methods then true progress can be made in arresting the injury epidemic with resultant reduction of nursing workforce losses with consequent healthcare system benefits.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
O'Donnell, John Mjod01@pitt.eduJOD01
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairSutton-Tyrrell, Kimtyrrell@edc.pitt.edu
Committee MemberBircher, Nicholasbircherng@anes.upmc.eduNGB1
Committee MemberPeele, Pamelapeelepb2@upmc.edu
Committee MemberHenker, Richardrhe001@pitt.eduRHE001
Committee MemberKelsey, Sherylkelseys@pitt.eduKELSEYS
Date: 27 January 2010
Date Type: Completion
Defense Date: 14 September 2009
Approval Date: 27 January 2010
Submission Date: 29 November 2009
Access Restriction: 5 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 5 years.
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Degree: DrPH - Doctor of Public Health
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Back Injury; Hierarchical Task Analysis; Injury Epidemiology; Part Task Training; Simulation
Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-11292009-173439/, etd-11292009-173439
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 20:06
Last Modified: 19 Dec 2016 14:37
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/9858

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