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The associations between pain, sleep, global health, and functional outcomes in older adults

Tran, Long (2021) The associations between pain, sleep, global health, and functional outcomes in older adults. Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Understanding the association of sleep and pain in older adults can help improve their global health and functional outcomes. This study aimed to describe the joint associations between sleep, pain, global health, and functional outcomes in adults ages 65 or older.
METHODS: This study was a secondary analysis of data from the 2015 Sleep in America Poll by the National Sleep Foundation. Outcome measures included global health, pain intensity, sleep disturbances, and impaired sleep’s interference with functional outcomes. The survey also included questions on demographics (age, sex, race, education, marital status, home Internet access), sleep (duration, efficiency, sleep debt, quality), and pain (type [no pain, acute pain, chronic pain], level of control). One-way ANOVA was conducted to compare mean scores of sleep disturbances and global health between the three pain groups. Multiple linear regression was conducted to examine the associations between pain intensity, sleep disturbances, global health, impaired sleep’s interference with functional outcomes, and perceived control of pain.
RESULTS: The sample (N = 248) was 65 – 91 years (mean = 72.8 ± 0.4), male (46.7%), White, Non- Hispanic (78.9.%), married/partnered (66.2%), post-high-school education (48%), and had home Internet access (70.4%). Respondents had approximately 7 hours of sleep, 87% sleep efficiency, and 10 minutes of sleep debt on average. “No pain” was reported by 38.7% of the sample (n = 96), “acute pain” by 32.7% (n = 81), and “chronic pain” by 28.6% (n = 71). Respondents with acute or chronic pain had significantly more sleep disturbances and worse global health compared to respondents with no pain (all p-value < 0.03). Higher pain intensity was associated with more sleep disturbances, worse global health, and more impaired sleep’s interference with functional outcomes (all p-value < 0.01). Higher perceived control over pain was associated with lower pain intensity, less sleep disturbances, better global health, and less impaired sleep’s interference with functional outcomes (all p-value < 0.02).
CONCLUSION: Pain has a negative impact on sleep, health, and functional outcomes in older adults. Perceived control of pain has a positive impact on pain, sleep, health, and functional outcomes in older adults.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Tran, Longlot15@pitt.edulot15
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairChasens, Eileenchasense@pitt.edu
Committee MemberScott, Paulpws5@pitt.edu
Committee MemberGodzik, Cassandracassandragodzik@gmail.com
Committee MemberJeon, Bominboj8@pitt.edu
Committee MemberKariuki, Jacobkigok@pitt.edu
Date: 26 April 2021
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 15 April 2021
Approval Date: 26 April 2021
Submission Date: 23 April 2021
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 74
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: University Honors College
School of Nursing > Nursing
Degree: BSN - Bachelor of Science in Nursing
Thesis Type: Undergraduate Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Pain Sleep Global Health Functional Outcomes Perceived Control of Pain
Date Deposited: 26 Apr 2021 16:11
Last Modified: 26 Apr 2021 16:11
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/40764

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