Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

Whole genome sequencing to investigate the emergence of clonal complex 23 Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y disease in the United States

UNSPECIFIED (2012) Whole genome sequencing to investigate the emergence of clonal complex 23 Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y disease in the United States. PLoS ONE, 7 (4).

[img]
Preview
PDF
Published Version
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (1MB) | Preview
[img] Plain Text (licence)
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (1kB)

Abstract

In the United States, serogroup Y, ST-23 clonal complex Neisseria meningitidis was responsible for an increase in meningococcal disease incidence during the 1990s. This increase was accompanied by antigenic shift of three outer membrane proteins, with a decrease in the population that predominated in the early 1990s as a different population emerged later in that decade. To understand factors that may have been responsible for the emergence of serogroup Y disease, we used whole genome pyrosequencing to investigate genetic differences between isolates from early and late N. meningitidis populations, obtained from meningococcal disease cases in Maryland in the 1990s. The genomes of isolates from the early and late populations were highly similar, with 1231 of 1776 shared genes exhibiting 100% amino acid identity and an average πN= 0.0033 and average πS= 0.0216. However, differences were found in predicted proteins that affect pilin structure and antigen profile and in predicted proteins involved in iron acquisition and uptake. The observed changes are consistent with acquisition of new alleles through horizontal gene transfer. Changes in antigen profile due to the genetic differences found in this study likely allowed the late population to emerge due to escape from population immunity. These findings may predict which antigenic factors are important in the cyclic epidemiology of meningococcal disease.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorBorrow, RayUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 27 April 2012
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 7
Number: 4
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0035699
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Infectious Diseases and Microbiology
School of Medicine > Infectious Diseases and Microbiology
Refereed: Yes
Other ID: NLM PMC3338715
PubMed Central ID: PMC3338715
PubMed ID: 22558202
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2012 20:21
Last Modified: 07 Jan 2019 14:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/14178

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics

Altmetric.com


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item